PDL BioPharma, Inc.
PDL BIOPHARMA, INC. (Form: 10-K, Received: 03/03/2014 16:03:51)


 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
___________________________________________
FORM 10-K
___________________________________________
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from              to
Commission File Number: 000-19756
___________________________________________
PDL BioPharma, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
___________________________________________
Delaware
94-3023969
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
932 Southwood Boulevard
Incline Village, Nevada 89451
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code
(775) 832-8500
___________________________________________
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of Class
Name of Exchange on which Registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share
The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
___________________________________________

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes ý   No ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes ¨   No ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes ý   No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes ý   No ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (Check one):
Large accelerated filer ý
Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer   ¨
Smaller reporting company ¨
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes ¨   No ý
The aggregate market value of shares of common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, based on the closing sale price of a share of common stock on June 28, 2013 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, was $1,077,901,101 .
 
As of February 14, 2014 , the registrant had outstanding 160,352,201 shares of common stock.
   
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant’s proxy statement to be delivered to stockholders with respect to the registrant’s 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be filed by the registrant with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (hereinafter referred to as the “Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The registrant intends to file its proxy statement within 120 days after its fiscal year end.
 
 



PDL BIOPHARMA, INC.
 
2013 Form 10-K Annual Report
 
Table of Contents
 
 
 
 
 
 PART I
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Item 1
 
 Item 1A
 
 Item 1B
 
 Item 2
 
 Item 3
 
 Item 4
 
 
 
 
 
 PART II
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Item 5
 
 Item 6
 
 Item 7
 
 Item 7A
 
 Item 8
 
 Item 9
 
 Item 9A
 
 Item 9B
 
 
 
 
 
 PART III
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Item 10
 
 Item 11
 
 Item 12
 
 Item 13
 
 Item 14
 
 
 
 
 
 PART IV
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Item 15
 
 
 
 
 





GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS


Abbreviation/term
 
Definition
 
 
 
'216B Patent
 
European Patent No. 0 451 216B
'761 Patent
 
U.S. Patent No. 5,693,761
2012 Notes
 
2.0% Convertible Senior Notes due February 15, 2012, fully retired at June 30, 2011
Abbott
 
Abbott Laboratories
AbbVie
 
AbbVie Biotherapeutics, Inc.
APIC
 
Additional paid-in-capital
ASC
 
Accounting Standards Codification
ASU
 
Accounting Standards Update
Avinger
 
Avinger, Inc.
AxoGen
 
AxoGen, Inc.
Biogen Idec
 
Biogen Idec, Inc.
BioTransplant
 
BioTransplant, Inc.
Chugai
 
Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.
Depomed
 
Depomed, Inc.
Direct Flow Medical
 
Direct Flow Medical, Inc.
Durata
 
Durata Therapeutics Holding C.V. and Durata Therapeutics International B.V. and Durata Therapeutics, Inc. (parent company)
Elan
 
Elan Corporation, PLC
EPO
 
European Patent Office
ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
 
Products that are both manufactured and sold outside of the United States
ex-U.S.-based Sales
 
Products that are manufactured in the United States and sold outside of the United States
EBITDA
 
Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization
EMA
 
European Medicines Agency
Facet
 
Facet Biotech Corporation. In April 2010, Abbott Laboratories acquired Facet and later renamed the company Abbott Biotherapeutics Corp., and in January 2013, Abbott Biotherapeutics Corp. was renamed AbbVie Biotherapeutics, Inc. and spun off from Abbott Laboratories as a subsidiary of AbbVie Inc.
FASB
 
Financial Accounting Standards Board
FDA
 
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
February 2015 Notes
 
2.875% Convertible Senior Notes due February 15, 2015, fully retired at September 30, 2013
February 2018 Notes
 
4.0% Convertible Senior Notes due February 1, 2018
GAAP
 
U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
Genentech
 
Genentech, Inc.
Genentech Products
 
Avastin ® , Herceptin ® , Lucentis ® , Xolair ® , Perjeta ®  and Kadcyla ®
IRS
 
Internal Revenue Service
KMPG
 
KPMG, LLP
LENSAR
 
LENSAR, Inc.
Lilly
 
Eli Lilly and Company
May 2015 Notes
 
3.75% Senior Convertible Notes due May 2015
Merus Labs
 
Merus Labs International, Inc.
Non-Recourse Notes
 
QHP PhaRMA SM  Senior Secured Notes due March 15, 2015, issued through our wholly-owned subsidiary, QHP Royalty Sub LLC, in November 2009, fully repaid in September 2012
Novartis
 
Novartis AG
OCI
 
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Paradigm Spine
 
Paradigm Spine, LLC
PDL, we, us, our, the Company
 
PDL BioPharma, Inc.

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Pfizer
 
Pfizer, Inc.
PLMA
 
Patent licensing master agreement
Queen et al. patents
 
PDL's patents in the United States and elsewhere covering the humanization of antibodies
Roche
 
F. Hoffman LaRoche, Ltd.
Royalty Agreement
 
Revenue Interests Purchase Agreement between PDL and AxoGen.
SEC
 
Securities and Exchange Commission
Series 2012 Notes
 
2.875% Series 2012 Convertible Senior Notes due February 15, 2015
Settlement Agreement
 
Settlement Agreement amongst Genentech and Roche, dated January 31, 2014
SPCs
 
Supplementary Protection Certificates
SPC Products
 
Avastin®, Herceptin®, Lucentis®, Xolair® and Tysabri®
Spin-Off
 
The spin-off by PDL of Facet
T-DM1
 
Trastuzumab-DM1
Term Loan
 
Credit agreement among PDL, the Royal Bank of Canada and lenders thereto, dated October 28, 2013
U.S.-based Sales
 
Products sold in the United States or manufactured in the United States and used or sold anywhere in the world
UCB
 
UCB Pharma S.A.
VWAP
 
Volume weighted average share price
Wellstat Diagnostics
 
Wellstat Diagnostics, LLC


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PART I
 
Forward-looking Statements
 
This Annual Report contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. All statements other than statements of historical facts are “forward-looking statements” for purposes of these provisions, including any projections of earnings, revenues or other financial items, any statements of the plans and objectives of management for future operations, including any statements concerning new licensing, any statements regarding future economic conditions or performance, and any statement of assumptions underlying any of the foregoing. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of terminology such as “may,” “will,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue” or “opportunity,” or the negative thereof or other comparable terminology. Although we believe that the expectations presented in the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable at the time of filing, there can be no assurance that such expectations or any of the forward-looking statements will prove to be correct, and actual results could differ materially from those projected or assumed in the forward-looking statements. Our future financial condition and results of operations, as well as any forward-looking statements, are subject to inherent risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to the risk factors set forth below, and for the reasons described elsewhere in this Annual Report. All forward-looking statements and reasons why results may differ included in this Annual Report are made as of the date hereof, and we assume no obligation to update these forward-looking statements or reasons why actual results might differ.
 
We own or have rights to certain trademarks, trade names, copyrights and other intellectual property used in our business, including PDL BioPharma and the PDL logo, each of which is considered a registered trademark. All other company names, product names, trade names and trademarks included in this Annual Report are trademarks, registered trademarks or trade names of their respective owners.
 
ITEM 1.          BUSINESS
 
Overview

PDL BioPharma manages a portfolio of patents and royalty assets, consisting primarily of its Queen et al. antibody humanization patents and license agreements with various biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. PDL pioneered the humanization of monoclonal antibodies and, by doing so, enabled the discovery of a new generation of targeted treatments for cancer and immunologic diseases for which it receives significant royalty revenue. PDL is currently focused on intellectual property asset management, acquiring new income generating assets and maximizing value for its shareholders.

The company was formerly known as Protein Design Labs, Inc. and changed its name to PDL BioPharma, Inc. in 2006. PDL was founded in 1986 and is headquartered in Incline Village, Nevada.

In 2011, PDL initiated a strategy to bring in new income generating assets from the healthcare sector. To accomplish this goal, PDL seeks to provide non-dilutive growth capital and financing solutions to late stage public and private healthcare companies and offers immediate financial monetization of royalty streams to companies, academic institutions and inventors. PDL continues to pursue this strategic initiative for which it has already invested approximately $500 million to date. PDL is focused on the quality of the income generating assets and potential returns on investment.

We continuously evaluate alternatives to increase return for our stockholders, for example, purchasing income generating assets, buying back or redeeming our convertible notes, repurchasing our common stock, paying dividends or selling the Company. At the beginning of each fiscal year, our board of directors reviews the Company's total annual dividend payment for the prior year and determines whether to increase, maintain or decrease the quarterly dividend payments for that year. The board of directors evaluates the financial condition of the Company and considers the economic outlook, corporate cash flow, the Company's liquidity needs and the health and stability of credit markets when determining whether to maintain or change the dividend.

Financial information about our operations, including our revenues and net income for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , and our total assets as of December 31, 2013 and 2012 , is included in our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes in Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”


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2014 Dividends
 
We currently utilize dividends to increase return for our stockholders. On January 29, 2014 , our board of directors declared that the regular quarterly dividends to be paid to our stockholders in 2014 will be  $0.15 per share of common stock, payable on March 12, June 12, September 12 and December 12 of 2014 to stockholders of record on March 5, June 5, September 5 and December 5 of 2014 , the record dates for each of the dividend payments, respectively. At the beginning of each fiscal year, our board of directors sets the Company’s total annual dividend payments for the year. The board of directors evaluates the financial condition of the Company and considers the economic outlook, corporate cash flow, the Company’s liquidity needs and the health and stability of credit markets when determining the dividend.
 
Intellectual Property
 
Patents
 
We have been issued patents in the United States and elsewhere, covering the humanization of antibodies, which we refer to as our Queen et al. patents. Our Queen et al. patents, for which final patent expiry is in December 2014, cover, among other things, humanized antibodies, methods for humanizing antibodies, polynucleotide encoding in humanized antibodies and methods of producing humanized antibodies.

Our U.S. Patent No. 5,693,761 (the '761 Patent), which expires on December 2, 2014, covers methods and materials used in the manufacture of humanized antibodies. In addition to covering methods and materials used in the manufacture of humanized antibodies, coverage under our ‘761 Patent will typically extend to the use or sale of compositions made with those methods and/or materials.

Our European Patent No. 451 216B (the '216B Patent) expired in Europe in December 2009. We have been granted SPCs for the Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair and Tysabri products in many of the jurisdictions in the European Union in connection with the ‘216B Patent. The SPCs effectively extend our patent protection with respect to SPC Products generally until December 2014, except that the SPCs for Herceptin will generally expire in July 2014. Because SPCs are granted on a jurisdiction-by-jurisdiction basis, the duration of the extension varies slightly in certain jurisdictions. We may still be eligible for royalties notwithstanding the unavailability of SPC protection if the relevant royalty-bearing humanized antibody product is also made, used, sold or offered for sale in or imported from a jurisdiction in which we have an unexpired Queen et al. patent such as the United States.
 
Licensing Agreements
 
We have entered into licensing agreements under our Queen et al. patents with numerous entities that are independently developing or have developed humanized antibodies. We receive royalties on net sales of products that are made, used and/or sold prior to patent expiry. In general, these agreements cover antibodies targeting antigens specified in the license agreements. Under our licensing agreements, we are entitled to receive a flat-rate or tiered royalty based upon our licensees’ net sales of covered antibodies. Before August 15, 2013, we were entitled received a tiered royalty from one of our licensees, Genentech, based upon certain of their net sales of covered antibodies. After August 15, 2013, all of the royalties received from Genentech are based solely upon a flat-rate. We also expect to receive annual maintenance fees from licensees of our Queen et al. patents prior to patent expiry as well as periodic milestone payments. Total annual milestone payments in each of the last several years have been less than 1% of total revenue and we expect this trend will continue through the expiration of the Queen et al. patents.

Our total revenues from U.S. based licensees under our Queen et al. patents were $154.2 million , $133.8 million and $137.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , respectively. Our total revenues from foreign based licensees were $277.5 million , $240.7 million and $224.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , respectively.
 

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Licensing Agreements for Marketed Products
 
In the year ended December 31, 2013 , we received royalties on Queen et al. patents on sales of the eight humanized antibody products listed below, all of which are currently approved for use by the FDA and other regulatory agencies outside the United States.

Licensee
 
Product Names
Genentech
 
Avastin ®
 
 
Herceptin ®
 
 
Xolair ®
 
 
Lucentis ®
 
 
Perjeta ®
 
 
Kadcyla ®
 
 
 
Biogen Idec 1
 
Tysabri ®
 
 
 
Chugai
 
Actemra ®
____________________
1 In April 2013, Biogen Idec completed its purchase of Elan's interest in Tysabri. Prior to this our licensee for Tysabri was identified as Elan.

For the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , we received royalty revenues under our license agreements of approximately $441.4 million , $374.5 million and $351.6 million , respectively.

On February 22, 2013, Genentech/Roche announced that the FDA approved Kadcyla for second line treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer and first line treatment for those patients who relapse within six months following adjuvant therapy. On November 20, 2013, Genentech/Roche announced EU approval for the treatment of adults with HER2-positive, inoperable locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who previously received Herceptin and a taxane, separately or in combination. On September 20, 2013, Japan approved it for the same indication. PDL began receiving royalties in the second quarter of 2013 for the sales that occurred in the first quarter of 2013. Because Kadcyla is an antibody drug conjugate, i.e., made up of the antibody, trastuzumab, and the chemotherapy, DM1, joined together using a stable linker, it is a “combination product” under the terms of the license agreement and PDL will not receive royalties on that portion of the sales of the drug attributable to the DM1.

On November 1, 2013, Genentech/Roche announced that Gazyva became the first therapy approved through the FDA’s breakthrough therapy designation, indicated in combination with chlorambucil to treat previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). PDL will begin receiving royalties in the first quarter of 2014 for the sales that occurred in the fourth quarter of 2013.

Genentech
 
We entered into a master patent license agreement, effective September 25, 1998, under which we granted Genentech a license under our Queen et al. patents to make, use and sell certain antibody products.

On January 31, 2014, we entered into a settlement agreement with Genentech and Roche which resolves all outstanding legal disputes between the parties, including our Nevada litigation with Genentech relating to an August 2010 facsimile sent by Genentech on behalf of Roche and Novartis asserting its products do not infringe on PDL’s SPC’s, and our arbitration proceedings with Genentech related to the audit of royalties on sales.

Under the terms of the Settlement Agreement, effective retroactively to August 15, 2013, Genentech will pay a fixed royalty rate of 2.125 percent on worldwide sales of all its licensed products, as compared to the previous tiered royalty rate in the U.S and the fixed rate on all ex-U.S. based manufactured and sold licensed products. Pursuant to the agreement, Genentech and Roche confirmed that Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair and Perjeta are licensed products as defined in the relevant license agreements between the parties, and further agreed that Kadcyla and Gazyva are licensed products. Genentech will pay these royalties on all worldwide sales of Avastin, Herceptin, Xolair, Perjeta and Kadcyla occurring on or before December 31, 2015. With respect to Lucentis, Genentech will owe no royalties on U.S. sales occurring after June 30, 2013, and will pay a royalty of 2.125 percent on

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all ex-U.S. sales occurring on or before December 28, 2014. The royalty term for Gazyva remains unchanged from the existing license agreement pertaining thereto.

The Settlement Agreement precludes Genentech and Roche from challenging the validity of PDL’s patents, including its SPCs in Europe, from contesting their obligation to pay royalties, from contesting patent coverage for Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair, Perjeta, Kadcyla and Gazyva and from assisting or encouraging any third party in challenging PDL’s patents and SPCs. The Settlement Agreement further outlines the conduct of any audits initiated by PDL of the books and records of Genentech in an effort to ensure a full and fair audit procedure. Finally, the Settlement Agreement clarifies that the sales amounts from which the royalties are calculated does not include certain taxes and discounts.

The Settlement Agreement provides greater certainty for each of the parties in terms of the royalty rate payable under the agreement and the period over which they will be payable. PDL expects to recognize royalty revenue on the licensed products until the first quarter of 2016. Additionally, the settlement terms provide for a better definition of revenues and audit inspection procedures related to the arbitration dispute filed by PDL.

Based upon the flat royalty rate of 2.125 percent being retroactive to August 15, 2013, we expect to receive a one-time payment of net royalties due under the Settlement Agreement, which will be recognized as royalty revenue in the first quarter of 2014.

Until the August 15, 2013, effective date of the above Settlement Agreement, our license agreement with Genentech entitled us to royalties following the expiration of our patents with respect to sales of licensed product manufactured prior to patent expiry in jurisdictions providing patent protection. Our master patent license agreement with Genentech provided for a tiered royalty structure under which the royalty rate Genentech paid on royalty-bearing products sold in the United States or manufactured in the United States and used or sold anywhere in the world in a given calendar year decreased on incremental U.S.-based Sales above certain sales thresholds based on 95% of the underlying gross U.S.-based Sales. The net sales thresholds and the applicable royalty rates are outlined below:

Genentech Products Made or Sold in the U.S.
 
Royalty Rate
Net sales up to $1.5 billion
 
3.0%
Net sales between $1.5 billion and up to $2.5 billion
 
2.5%
Net sales between $2.5 billion and up to $4.0 billion
 
2.0%
Net sales exceeding $4.0 billion
 
1.0%
 
 
 
Genentech Products Made and Sold ex-U.S.
 
 
Net sales
 
3.0%

As a result of the tiered royalty structure, Genentech’s average annual royalty rate for a given year declined as Genentech’s U.S.-based Sales increased during that year. Because we receive royalties one quarter in arrears, the average royalty rates for the payments we received from Genentech for U.S.-based Sales in the second calendar quarter for Genentech’s sales from the first calendar quarter were higher than the average royalty rates for following quarters. The average royalty rates for payments we received from Genentech were generally lowest in the fourth and first calendar quarters for Genentech’s sales from the third and fourth calendar quarters when more of Genentech’s U.S.-based Sales bore royalties at the 1% royalty rate. In 2013, the blended rate for the full year of royalties from Genentech products was approximately 1.9%.


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With respect to ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales, before August 15, 2013, the royalty rate that we received from Genentech was a fixed rate of 3.0% based on 95% of the underlying gross sales. The mix of U.S.-based Sales and ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales fluctuated. The percentage of net global sales that were generated outside of the United States and the percentage of net global sales that were ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales are outlined in the following table:

 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Avastin
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
58
%
 
56
%
 
55
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
43
%
 
29
%
 
21
%
Herceptin
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
68
%
 
69
%
 
71
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
40
%
 
37
%
 
35
%
Kadcyla
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
2
%
 
0
%
 
0
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
0
%
 
0
%
 
0
%
Lucentis
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
64
%
 
63
%
 
59
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
0
%
 
0
%
 
0
%
Perjeta
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
24
%
 
1
%
 
0
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
0
%
 
0
%
 
0
%
Xolair
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
40
%
 
39
%
 
40
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
40
%
 
39
%
 
40
%

The information in the table above is based on information provided to us by Genentech. We were not provided the reasons for the fluctuations in the manufacturing split between U.S.-based Sales and ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales.
 
In the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , PDL received royalties from ex-U.S. based Manufacturing and Sales of three of Genentech’s licensed products: Herceptin, Avastin and Xolair. Roche, Genentech's parent company, produces Avastin and Herceptin in plants in Basel, Switzerland, and Penzberg, Germany, respectively.

The master patent license agreement continues until the expiration of the last to expire of our Queen et al. patents but may be terminated: (i) by Genentech prior to such expiration upon sixty days written notice, (ii) by either party upon a material breach by the other party or (iii) upon the occurrence of certain bankruptcy-related events.

On June 8, 2012, Genentech announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Perjeta (pertuzumab). Perjeta is approved in combination with Herceptin and docetaxel chemotherapy for the treatment of people with HER2-postive metastatic breast cancer who have not received prior anti-HER2 therapy or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. PDL began receiving royalties generated from Perjeta during the year ended December 31, 2012.

On March 5, 2013, Genentech announced that Perjeta was approved by the EMA in combination with Herceptin and docetaxel chemotherapy for the treatment of people with HER2-postive metastatic breast cancer who have not received prior anti-HER2 therapy or chemotherapy for metastatic disease.

On September 30, 2013, the FDA granted accelerated approval to Perjeta in combination with Herceptin and other chemotherapy for the treatment of HER2-positive, locally advanced, inflammatory or early stage breast cancer prior to surgery. Perjeta is the first drug approved in this setting.

On February 22, 2013, Genentech announced that the FDA approved Kadcyla for second line treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer and first line treatment for those patients who relapse within six months following adjuvant therapy. On

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November 20, 2013, Genentech/Roche announced EU approval for the treatment of adults with HER2-positive, inoperable locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who previously received Herceptin and a taxane, separately or in combination. On September 20, 2013, Japan approved it for the same indication. PDL began receiving royalties in the second quarter of 2013 for the sales that occurred in the first quarter of 2013. Because Kadcyla is an antibody drug conjugate, i.e., made up of the antibody, trastuzumab, and the chemotherapy, DM1, joined together using a stable linker, it is a “combination product” under the terms of the license agreement and PDL will not receive royalties on that portion of the sales of the drug attributable to the DM1.

On November 1, 2013, Genentech/Roche announced that Gazyva became the first therapy approved through the FDA’s breakthrough therapy designation, indicated in combination with chlorambucil to treat previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). PDL will begin receiving royalties in the first quarter of 2014 for the sales that occurred in the fourth quarter of 2013.

Biogen Idec

We entered into a patent license agreement, effective April 24, 1998, under which we granted to Elan a license under our Queen et al. patents to make, use and sell antibodies that bind to the cellular adhesion molecule α4 in patients with multiple sclerosis. Under the agreement, we are entitled to receive a flat royalty rate in the low single digits based on Elan’s net sales of the Tysabri product. Our license agreement with Elan entitles us to royalties following the expiration of our patents with respect to sales of licensed product manufactured prior to patent expiry in jurisdictions providing patent protection. The agreement continues until the expiration of the last to expire of our Queen et al. patents but may be terminated: (i) by Elan prior to such expiration upon sixty days written notice, (ii) by either party upon a material breach by the other party or (iii) upon the occurrence of certain bankruptcy-related events. In April 2013, Biogen Idec completed its purchase of Elan's interest in Tysabri. All obligations under our original patent license agreement with Elan have been assumed by Biogen Idec. 

Chugai

We entered into a patent license agreement, effective May 18, 2000, with Chugai, a majority owned subsidiary of Roche, under which we granted to Chugai a license under our Queen et al. patents to make, use and sell antibodies that bind to interleukin-6 receptors to prevent inflammatory cascades involving multiple cell types for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Under the agreement, we are entitled to receive a flat royalty rate in the low single digits based on net sales of the Actemra product manufactured in the U.S. prior to patent expiry. The agreement continues until the expiration of the last to expire of our Queen et al. patents but may be terminated: (i) by Chugai prior to such expiration upon sixty days written notice, (ii) by either party upon a material breach by the other party or (iii) upon the occurrence of certain bankruptcy-related events.

Depomed

On October 18, 2013, we entered into a royalty purchase and sale agreement with Depomed, Inc. and its subsidiary, whereby we acquired the rights to receive royalties and milestones payable on sales of Type 2 diabetes products licensed by Depomed in exchange for a $240.5 million cash payment. As the licensor of certain patents, Depomed retains various rights, including the contractual right to audit its licensees and to ensure those licensees are complying with the terms of the underlying license agreement. Depomed retains full responsibility to protect and maintain the intellectual property rights underlying the licenses. In respect of the royalty stream relating to the Glumetza diabetes medication that we acquired from Depomed, which is the royalty right producing the highest revenues from the Depomed acquired royalties, U.S. patent protection for this product is expected to begin to expire in September 2016, and under settlement agreements to which Depomed is a party, certain manufacturers of generic products will be permitted to enter the market starting in February and August 2016.

Licensing Agreements for Non-Marketed Products

We have also entered into licensing agreements under which we have licensed certain rights under our Queen et al. patents to make, use and sell certain products that are not currently marketed. Certain of these development-stage products are currently in Phase 3 clinical trials. With respect to these agreements, we may receive payments based on certain development milestones and annual maintenance fees. We may also receive royalty payments if the licensed products receive marketing approval and are manufactured or generate sales before the expiration of our Queen et al. patents. For example, solanezumab is the Lilly-licensed antibody for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. If Lilly’s antibody for Alzheimer’s disease is approved, we would be entitled to receive a royalty based on a "know-how" license for technology provided in the design of this antibody. Unlike the royalty for the patent license, the two percent royalty payable for "know-how" runs for 12.5 years after the product's initial commercialization.


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Protection of our Intellectual Property
 
Our intellectual property, namely our Queen et al. patents and related license agreements, are integral to our business and generate nearly all of our revenues. Protection of our intellectual property is key to our success.
 
Genentech / Roche Matter

Settlement Agreement

We entered into a master patent license agreement, effective September 25, 1998, under which we granted Genentech a license under our Queen et al. patents to make, use and sell certain antibody products.

On January 31, 2014, we entered into a settlement agreement with Genentech and Roche which resolves all outstanding legal disputes between the parties, including our Nevada litigation with Genentech relating to an August 2010 facsimile sent by Genentech on behalf of Roche and Novartis asserting its products do not infringe on PDL’s SPC’s, and our arbitration proceedings with Genentech related to the audit of royalties on sales.

Under the terms of the Settlement Agreement, effective retroactively to August 15, 2013, Genentech will pay a fixed royalty rate of 2.125 percent on worldwide sales of all its licensed products, as compared to the previous tiered royalty rate in the U.S and the fixed rate on all ex-U.S. based manufactured and sold licensed products. Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Genentech and Roche confirmed that Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair and Perjeta are licensed products as defined in the relevant license agreements between the parties, and further agreed that Kadcyla and Gazyva are licensed products. Genentech will pay these royalties on all worldwide sales of Avastin, Herceptin, Xolair, Perjeta and Kadcyla occurring on or before December 31, 2015. With respect to Lucentis, Genentech will owe no royalties on U.S. sales occurring after June 30, 2013, and will pay a royalty of 2.125 percent on all ex-U.S. sales occurring on or before December 28, 2014. The royalty term for Gazyva remains unchanged from the existing license agreement pertaining thereto.

The Settlement Agreement precludes Genentech and Roche from challenging the validity of PDL’s patents, including its SPCs in Europe, from contesting their obligation to pay royalties, from contesting patent coverage for Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair, Perjeta, Kadcyla and Gazyva and from assisting or encouraging any third party in challenging PDL’s patents and SPCs. The Settlement Agreement further outlines the conduct of any audits initiated by PDL of the books and records of Genentech in an effort to ensure a full and fair audit procedure. Finally, the Settlement Agreement clarifies that the sales amounts from which the royalties are calculated does not include certain taxes and discounts.

The Settlement Agreement provides greater certainty for each of the parties in terms of the royalty rate payable under the agreement and the period over which they will be payable. PDL expects to recognize royalty revenue on the licensed products until the first quarter of 2016. Additionally, the settlement terms provide for a better definition of revenues and audit inspection procedures related to the arbitration dispute filed by PDL.

Income Generating Asset Acquisitions
 
The last of PDL’s Queen et al. patents expire in December 2014, with the obligation to pay royalties under the majority of our various license agreements expiring the first quarter of 2016. Consequently, we are acquiring income generating assets if such assets can be acquired on terms that allow us to increase the return to our stockholders. We primarily focus our income generating asset acquisition strategy on commercial stage therapies and devices having strong economic fundamentals and intellectual property protection.

Notes and Other Long-term Receivables

Wellstat Diagnostics Note Receivable and Credit Agreement

In March 2012, the Company executed a $7.5 million two-year senior secured note receivable with the holders of the equity interests in Wellstat Diagnostics. In addition to bearing interest at 10% per annum, the note gave PDL certain rights to negotiate for certain future financing transactions. In August 2012, PDL and the borrowers amended the note receivable, providing a senior secured note receivable of $10.0 million, bearing interest at 12% per annum, to replace the original $7.5 million note. This $10.0 million note was repaid on November 2, 2012.


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On November 2, 2012, the Company and Wellstat Diagnostics entered into a $40.0 million credit agreement pursuant to which the Company is to accrue quarterly interest payments at the rate of 5% per annum (payable in cash or in kind). In addition, PDL will receive quarterly royalty payments based on a low double digit royalty rate of Wellstat Diagnostics' net revenues, generated by the sale, distribution or other use of Wellstat Diagnostics' products, if any, commencing upon the commercialization of its products.

In January 2013, the Company was informed that, as of November 2012, Wellstat Diagnostics had used funds contrary to the terms of the credit agreement and breached Sections 2.1.2 and 7 of the credit agreement. PDL sent Wellstat Diagnostics a notice of default on January 22, 2013, and accelerated the amounts owed under the credit agreement. In connection with the notice of default, PDL exercised one of its available remedies and transferred approximately $8.1 million of available cash from a bank account of Wellstat Diagnostics to PDL and applied the funds to amounts due under the credit agreement. On February 28, 2013, the parties entered into a forbearance agreement whereby PDL agreed to refrain from exercising additional remedies for 120 days while Wellstat Diagnostics raised funds to capitalize the business and the parties attempted to negotiate a revised credit agreement. PDL agreed to provide up to $7.9 million to Wellstat Diagnostics to fund the business for the 120-day forbearance period under the terms of the forbearance agreement. Following the conclusion of the June 28 forbearance period, the Company agreed to forbear in its exercise of remedies for additional periods of time to allow the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics to complete a pending financing transaction. During such forbearance period, the Company provided approximately $1.3 million to Wellstat Diagnostics to fund ongoing operations of the business. During the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately $8.7 million was advanced pursuant to the forbearance agreement.

On August 15, 2013, the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics completed a financing transaction to fulfill its obligations under the forbearance agreement. On August 15, 2013, the Company entered into an amended and restated credit agreement with Wellstat Diagnostics. The Company determined that the new agreement should be accounted for as a modification of the existing agreement.

Except as otherwise described here, the material terms of the amended credit agreement are substantially the same as those of the original credit agreement, including quarterly interest payments at the rate of 5% per annum (payable in cash or in kind). In addition, PDL will receive quarterly royalty payments based on a low double digit royalty rate of Wellstat Diagnostics' net revenues upon successful commercialization. However, pursuant to the amended credit agreement: (i) the principal amount was reset to approximately $44.1 million which was comprised of approximately $33.7 million original loan principal and interest, $1.3 million term loan principal and interest and $9.1 million forbearance principal and interest; (ii) the specified internal rates of return increased; (iii) the default interest rate was increased; (iv) Wellstat Diagnostics' obligation to provide certain financial information increased in frequency to monthly; (v) internal financial controls were strengthened by requiring Wellstat Diagnostics to maintain an independent, third-party financial professional with control over fund disbursements; (vi) the Company waived the existing events of default; and (vii) the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics are required to contribute additional capital to Wellstat Diagnostics upon the sale, if any, of an affiliated entity. The restated credit agreement continues to have an ultimate maturity date of December 31, 2021 (but may mature earlier upon certain specified events).

When the principal amount was reset it resulted in a $2.5 million reduction of the carrying value of the note receivable which was recorded as a financing cost as a component of interest and other income, net. The new carrying value is lower as a function of the variable nature of the internal rate of return to be realized by the Company based on when the note is repaid. The internal rate of return calculation, although increased, was reset when the credit agreement was amended and restated.

Wellstat Diagnostics may prepay the amended credit agreement at a price that, together with interest and royalty payments already made to the Company, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company. In the event of a change of control, bankruptcy or certain other customary events of defaults, or Wellstat Diagnostics' failure to achieve a specified annual revenue threshold in 2017, Wellstat Diagnostics will be required to prepay the amended credit agreement at a price that, together with interest and royalty payments already made to the Company, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company. The amended credit agreement is secured by a pledge of all of the assets of Wellstat Diagnostics, a pledge of all of Wellstat Diagnostics’ equity interests by the holders thereof, and a second lien on the assets of the affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics.

Merus Labs Note Receivable and Credit Agreement

In July 2012, PDL loaned $35.0 million to Merus Labs in connection with its acquisition of a commercial-stage pharmaceutical product and related assets. In addition, PDL agreed to provide a $20.0 million letter of credit on behalf of Merus Labs for the seller of the assets to draw upon to satisfy the remaining $20.0 million purchase price obligation. The seller made this draw on the letter of credit in July 2013 and an additional loan to Merus Labs for $20.0 million was recorded for an aggregate of $55.0 million in total borrowings.


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Outstanding borrowings under the July 2012 loan bore interest at the rate of 13.5% per annum and outstanding borrowings as a result of the draw on the letter of credit bore interest at the rate of 14.0% per annum. Merus Labs was required to make four periodic principal payments in respect of the July 2012 loan, with repayment of the remaining principal balance of all loans due on March 31, 2015. The borrowings were subject to mandatory prepayments upon certain asset dispositions or debt issuances as set forth in the credit agreement. Merus Labs made the first of these payments in December 2012 in the amount of $5.0 million, and made the second payment in June 2013 in the amount of $7.5 million. In September 2013, Merus Labs made two additional payments totaling $43.3 million, including the prepayment fee, in order to pay its remaining outstanding balance.

In September 2013, Merus Labs prepaid in full its obligations under the credit agreement , including accrued interest through the payment date and a prepayment fee of 1% of the aggregate principal amount outstanding at the time of repayment. There was no outstanding balance owed as of December 31, 2013 .

AxoGen Royalty Agreement

In October 2012, PDL entered into the Royalty Agreement with AxoGen pursuant to which the Company will receive specified royalties on AxoGen’s net revenues (as defined in the Royalty Agreement) generated by the sale, distribution or other use of AxoGen’s products (assigned interests). The Royalty Agreement has an eight year term and provides PDL with royalties of 9.95% based on AxoGen net revenues, subject to agreed-upon guaranteed quarterly minimum payments of approximately $1.3 to $2.5 million beginning in the fourth quarter of 2014, and the right to require AxoGen to repurchase the Royalty Agreement at the end of the fourth year. AxoGen has been granted certain rights to call the contract in years five through eight. The total consideration PDL paid to AxoGen for the assigned interests was $20.8 million, including the termination of an interim funding of $1.8 million in August 2012. AxoGen was required to use a portion of the proceeds from the Royalty Agreement to pay the outstanding balance under its existing credit facility with a third party. AxoGen plans to use the remainder of the proceeds to support the business plan for its products. The royalty rights are secured by the cash and accounts receivable of AxoGen.

Under the Royalty Agreement, beginning on October 1, 2016, or in the event of the occurrence of a material adverse event or AxoGen's bankruptcy or material breach of the Royalty Agreement, the Company may require AxoGen to repurchase the assigned interests at a price that, together with payments already made by AxoGen, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company.

In the event of a change of control, AxoGen must repurchase the assigned interests from the Company for a repurchase price equal to an amount that, together with payments already made by AxoGen, would generate a 32.5% internal rate of return to the Company.

At any time after September 30, 2016, AxoGen, at its option, can repurchase the assigned interests under the Royalty Agreement for a price applicable in a change of control.

During the term of the Royalty Agreement, the Company is entitled to designate an individual to be a member of AxoGen's board of directors. The Company has exercised this right and on October 5, 2012, upon close of the transaction, the Company's President and Chief Executive Officer was elected to AxoGen's board of directors.

On August 14, 2013, PDL purchased 1,166,666 shares of AXGN at $3.00 per share, totaling $3.5 million.

Avinger Note Receivable and Royalty Agreement

On April 18, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Avinger, under which we made available to Avinger up to $40.0 million to be used by Avinger in connection with the commercialization of its currently marketed lumivascular catheter devices and in the development of Avinger's lumivascular atherectomy device. Of the $40.0 million available to Avinger, we funded an initial $20.0 million, net of fees, at close of the transaction. Upon the attainment by Avinger of a certain revenue milestone to be accomplished no later than the end of the first half of 2014, we will fund them an additional amount between $10.0 million and $20.0 million (net of fees) at Avinger's election. Outstanding borrowings under the initial loan bear interest at a stated rate of 12% per annum, and any future outstanding borrowings as a result of an additional amount funded upon reaching the revenue milestone will bear interest at the rate of 14% per annum.

Avinger is required to make quarterly interest and principal payments. Principal repayment will commence on: (i) the eleventh interest payment date if the revenue milestone is not achieved or (ii) the thirteenth interest payment date if the revenue milestone is achieved. The principal amount outstanding at commencement of repayment, after taking into account any payment-in-kind, will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature in April 2018.

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In connection with entering into the credit agreement, the Company will receive a low, single-digit royalty on Avinger's net revenues through April 2018. Avinger may prepay the outstanding principal and accrued interest on the notes receivable at any time. If Avinger repays the notes receivable prior to April 2018, the royalty on Avinger's net revenues will be reduced by 50% and will be subject to certain minimum payments from the prepayment date through April 2018.

The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Avinger and any of its subsidiaries (other than controlled foreign corporations, if any). The credit agreement provides for a number of standard events of default, including payment, bankruptcy, covenant, representation and warranty and judgment defaults.

LENSAR Credit Agreement

On October 1, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with LENSAR, under which PDL made available to LENSAR up to $60 million to be used by LENSAR in connection with the commercialization of its currently marketed LENSAR Laser System. Of the $60 million available to LENSAR, an initial $40 million, net of fees, was funded by PDL at close of the transaction. Upon the attainment by LENSAR of a specified sales milestone to be accomplished no later than September 30, 2014, PDL will fund LENSAR an additional $20 million. Outstanding borrowings under the loans bear interest at the rate of 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears.

Principal repayment will commence on the thirteenth interest payment date or December 30, 2016. The principal amount outstanding at the commencement of repayment will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature on October 1, 2018. LENSAR may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The loans are secured by all of the assets of LENSAR.

Durata Credit Agreement

On October 31, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Durata, whereby the Company made available to Durata up to $70.0 million . Of the $70.0 million available to Durata, an initial $25.0 million (tranche one), net of fees, was funded by the Company at the close of the transaction. Upon marketing approval of dalbavancin in the United States, to be accomplished no later than December 31, 2014 (the tranche two milestone), the Company will fund Durata an additional $15 million (tranche two). Within 9 months after the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, Durata may request up to a single additional $30 million borrowing. Until the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, outstanding borrowings under tranche one bear interest at the rate of 14.0% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears. Upon occurrence of the tranche two milestone, the interest rate of the loans will decrease to 12.75%.

Principal repayment will commence on the fifth interest payment date, March 31, 2015. The principal amount outstanding will be repaid quarterly over the remainder of the loans in an increasing percentage of the principal outstanding at commencement of repayment. The loans will mature on October 31, 2018. Durata may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The Company is entitled to receive a fee in addition to the prepayment penalty in the event that Durata undergoes a change in control. The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Durata.

Direct Flow Medical Credit Agreement

On November 5, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Direct Flow Medical, in which PDL will provide up to $50.0 million to Direct Flow Medical. Of the $50.0 million available to Direct Flow Medical, an initial $35.0 million (tranche one), net of fees, was provided by the Company at the close of the transaction. Upon the attainment of a specified revenue milestone to be accomplished no later than December 31, 2014 (the tranche two milestone), the Company will loan to Direct Flow Medical an additional $15.0 million, net of fees. Until the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, outstanding borrowings under tranche one bear interest at the rate of 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears. Upon occurrence of the tranche two milestone, the interest rate of the loans will decrease to 13.5%.

Principal repayment will commence on the twelfth interest payment date, September 30, 2016. The principal amount outstanding at commencement of repayment will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature on November 5, 2018. Direct Flow Medical may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Direct Flow Medical and any of its subsidiaries.


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Paradigm Spine

On February 14, 2014, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Paradigm Spine, LLC, under which PDL made available to Paradigm up to $75 million to be used by Paradigm to refinance its existing credit facility and expand its domestic commercial operations. A portion of the amount available under the agreement in an aggregate principal amount equal to $50 million, net of fees, was funded at the close of the transaction. In the event that certain specified sales and other milestones occur before December 31, 2014, PDL will fund Paradigm between an additional $6.25 million and $12.5 million, at Paradigm’s discretion. In the event that additional specified sales and other milestones occur before June 30, 2015, PDL will fund up to an additional $12.5 million also at Paradigm’s discretion. Borrowings under the credit agreement bear interest at the rate of 13.0% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears.

Principal repayment will commence on the eleventh interest payment date, September 30, 2016. The principal amount outstanding at commencement of repayment will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature on February 14, 2019, or, if Paradigm has achieved the first milestone and the additional loan amount is provided to Paradigm, the loans will mature on August 14, 2019. Paradigm may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Paradigm and its domestic subsidiaries and, initially, certain assets of Paradigm’s German subsidiaries.

Intangible Assets

Depomed Royalty Purchase and Sales Agreement

On October 18, 2013, PDL entered into a royalty purchase and sale agreement with Depomed, Inc. and Depo DR Sub, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Depomed, whereby the Company acquired the rights to receive royalties and milestones payables on sales of Type 2 diabetes products licensed by Depomed in exchange for a $240.5 million cash payment. The transaction closed simultaneously with the execution of the royalty agreement.

Under the terms of the royalty agreement, the Company will receive all royalty and milestone payments due under license agreements between Depomed and its licensees until the Company has received payments equal to two times the cash payment made to Depomed, after which all net payments received will be shared evenly between the Company and Depomed.

The royalty agreement terminates on the third anniversary following the date upon which the later of the following occurs: (a) October 25, 2021, or (b) at such time as no royalty payments remain payable under any license agreement and each of the license agreements has expired by its terms.

Convertible Notes

Series 2012 Notes

We have actively worked to restructure the Company’s capital and reduce the potential dilution associated with our convertible notes. As part of those efforts, in January 2012, we exchanged and subsequently retired $169.0 million aggregate principal amount of our February 2015 Notes for an identical principal amount of our new Series 2012 Notes, plus a cash payment of $5.00 for each $1,000 principal amount tendered for a total cash incentive payment of approximately $0.8 million. In February 2012, we entered into separate privately negotiated exchange agreements under which we exchanged and subsequently retired an additional $10.0 million aggregate principal amount of our February 2015 Notes for $10.0 million aggregate principal amount of our Series 2012 Notes. In August 2013, the Company entered into a separate privately negotiated exchange agreement under which it retired the final $1.0 million aggregate principal amount of the Company's outstanding February 2015 Notes. Pursuant to the exchange agreement, the holder of the February 2015 Notes received $1.0 million aggregate principal amount of the Company's Series 2012 Notes. Immediately following the exchange, no principal amount of the February 2015 Notes remained outstanding and $180.0 million principal amount of the Series 2012 Notes is outstanding.

Our Series 2012 Notes net share settle, meaning that if a conversion occurs, the principal amount is due in cash, and to the extent that the conversion value exceeds the principal amount, the difference is due in shares of our common stock. The effect of issuing $179.0 million aggregate principal of our Series 2012 Notes with the net share settle feature in exchange for our February 2015 Notes was the reduction of 27.8 million shares of potential dilution to our stockholders at the time of the exchange.

On February 5 and 6, 2014, the Company entered into separate, privately negotiated exchange and purchase agreements under which it retired $131.7 million in aggregate principal of the Company’s outstanding Series 2012 Notes. The exchange agreements

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provided for the issuance, by the Company, of shares of common stock and a cash payment for the Series 2012 Notes being exchanged, and the purchase agreement provided for a cash payment for the Series 2012 Notes being repurchased. The Company issued a total of 20.3 million shares of its common stock and paid an aggregate cash payment of $34.2 million pursuant to the exchange and repurchase agreements.

May 2015 Notes

On May 16, 2011, the Company issued $155.3 million in aggregate principal amount, at par, of our May 2015 Notes in an underwritten public offering, for net proceeds of $149.7 million. Our May 2015 Notes are due May 1, 2015, and we pay interest at 3.75% on our May 2015 Notes semiannually in arrears on May 1 and November 1 of each year, beginning November 1, 2011. Proceeds from our May 2015 Notes, net of amounts used for purchased call option transactions and provided by the warrant transactions described below, were used to redeem our 2012 Notes. Upon the occurrence of a fundamental change, as defined in the indenture, holders have the option to require PDL to repurchase their May 2015 Notes at a purchase price equal to 100% of the principal, plus accrued interest.

February 2018 Notes

On February 6, 2014, the Company agreed to sell $260.87 million aggregate principal amount of its 4.00% Convertible Senior Notes due February 1, 2018, in an underwritten public offering. The conversion rate of the February 2018 Notes will initially be 109.1048 shares of common stock per $1,000 principal amount of the February 2018 Notes equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $9.17 per share of common stock. The conversion rate, subject to increase under certain circumstances, will not be increased in respect of regular quarterly cash dividends paid by us that do not exceed $0.15 per share.

On February 12, 2014, the Company issued $300 million aggregate principal amount of February 2018 Notes, which included $39.13 million aggregate principal amount of February 2018 Notes issued pursuant to the exercise of the underwriters’ overallotment option to purchase additional 2018 Notes. In connection with the offering of the February 2018 Notes, PDL entered into privately negotiated convertible note hedge transactions with affiliates of RBC Capital Markets and Well Fargo Securities (“hedge counterparties”) and privately negotiated warrant transactions with the hedge counterparties relating to the same number of shares of PDL’s common stock.

Effect of December 12, 2013, Dividend Payment on Conversion Rates for the Convertible Notes
 
In connection with the December 12, 2013, dividend payment, the conversion rates for our convertible notes adjusted as follows:

Convertible Notes
 
Conversion Rate
per $1,000
Principal Amount
 
Approximate
Conversion Price Per Common Share
 
Effective Date
Series 2012 Notes
 
182.598

 
$
5.48

 
December 3, 2013
May 2015 Notes
 
159.9165

 
$
6.25

 
December 3, 2013

Term Loan

On October 28, 2013, PDL entered into the Term loan for $75 million, with a term of one year.

The interest rates per annum applicable to amounts outstanding under the Term Loan are, at the Company’s option, either (a) the base rate plus 1.00%, or (b) the Eurodollar rate plus 2.00% per annum. As of December 31, 2013, the interest rate was 2.24%. Interest and principal payments associated with the Term Loan are due on the interest payment dates of January 31, April 30, and July 31 of 2014, with the remaining outstanding balance due on October 28, 2014.

Any future material domestic subsidiaries of the Company are required to guarantee the obligations of the Company under the Term Loan, except as otherwise provided. The Company’s obligations under the Term Loan are secured by a lien on a substantial portion of its assets.

The Term Loan contains affirmative and negative covenants that the Company believes are usual and customary for a senior secured credit agreement. The Term loan also requires compliance with certain financial covenants, including a maximum total leverage ratio and a debt service coverage ratio, in each case calculated as set forth in the Term Loan and compliance with which may be necessary to take certain corporate actions.

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The Term Loan contains events of default that the Company believes are usual and customary for a senior secured credit agreement.

Major Customers
 
Our revenues consist almost entirely of royalties. We also receive periodic milestone payments from licensees of our Queen et al. patents and may continue to receive payments if the licensed products in development achieve certain development milestones. In addition, we will receive royalty payments if the licensed products receive marketing approval and are manufactured or generate sales before the expiration of our Queen et al. patents. In 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , Genentech accounted for 83% , 85% , and 86% of our revenues, respectively, and Biogen Idec (formerly Elan) accounted for 11% , 13% and 12% of our revenues, respectively.
 
Employees
 
As of  December 31, 2013 , we had less than ten full-time employees managing our intellectual property, our asset acquisitions and other corporate activities as well as providing for certain essential reporting and management functions of a public company. None of our employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement.
 
Available Information
 
We file electronically with the SEC our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The public may read and copy any materials we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 450 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. The address of that website is www.sec.gov.
 
We make available free of charge on or through our website at www.pdl.com our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and proxy statements, as well as amendments to these reports and statements, as soon as practicable after we have electronically filed such material with, or furnished them to, the SEC. You may also obtain copies of these filings free of charge by calling us at (775) 832-8500. Also, our Audit Committee Charter, Compensation Committee Charter, Nominating and Governance Committee Charter, Litigation Committee Charter, Corporate Governance Guidelines and Code of Business Conduct are also available free of charge on our website or by calling the number listed above.

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ITEM 1A.        RISK FACTORS
 
You should carefully consider and evaluate all of the information included and incorporated by reference in this Annual Report, including the risk factors listed below. Any of these risks, as well as other risks and uncertainties, could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition, which in turn could materially and adversely affect the trading price of shares of our common stock. Additional risks not currently known or currently material to us may also harm our business.
Keep these risk factors in mind when you read forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report and the documents incorporated by reference in this Annual Report. These statements relate to our expectations about future events and time periods. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue” or “opportunity,” the negative of these words or words of similar import. Similarly, statements that describe our reserves and our future plans, strategies, intentions, expectations, objectives, goals or prospects are also forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, and future events and circumstances could differ significantly from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements.
 
We must protect our patent and other intellectual property rights to succeed.
 
Our success is dependent in significant part on our ability to protect the scope, validity and enforceability of our intellectual property, including our patents, SPCs and license agreements. The scope, validity, enforceability and effective term of patents and SPCs can be highly uncertain and often involve complex legal and factual questions and proceedings. In addition, the legal principles applicable to patents in any given jurisdiction may be altered through changing court precedent and legislative action, and such changes may affect the scope, strength and enforceability of our patent rights or the nature of proceedings which may be brought by us or a third party related to our patent rights. A finding in a proceeding related to our patent rights which narrows the scope or which affects the validity or enforceability of some or all of our patent rights could have a material impact on our ability to continue to collect royalty payments from our licensees or execute new license agreements.
 
Any of these proceedings could further result in either loss of a patent or loss or reduction in the scope of one or more of the claims of the patent or claims underlying an SPC. These proceedings could be expensive, last several years and result in a significant reduction in the scope or invalidation of our patents. Any limitation in claim scope could reduce our ability to collect royalties or commence enforcement proceedings based on these patents. Moreover, the scope of a patent in one country does not assure similar scope of a patent with similar claims in another country. Also, claim interpretation and infringement laws vary among countries. Additionally, we depend on our license agreements to enforce royalty obligations against our licensees. Any limitations in our ability to enforce, such as limits on the scope of and/or an adverse interpretation of, the various licensee obligations in our licenses and related agreements could reduce our ability to collect royalties based on our license agreements . As a result of these factors, we are unable to predict the extent of our intellectual property protection in any country. For further information, see “Item 3—Legal Proceedings.”

Failure to acquire additional sources of revenue, including royalty revenue, after expiration of our Queen et al. patents may cause us to have insufficient revenues to continue operations.

Substantially all of our revenues consist of royalties from licensees of our Queen et al. patents, which expire in December 2014. Unless we are able to acquire sufficient alternative income-generating assets, such as royalty rights on commercially reasonable terms, we will no longer receive patent-related royalties or other revenues once our Queen et al. licensees have sold all their inventory of licensed product on which they are contractually bound to pay us a royalty. If we are unsuccessful in acquiring sufficient new sources of income, we will likely liquidate our business.

Our common stock may lose value, our common stock could be delisted from NASDAQ and our business may be liquidated due to several factors, including the expiration of our Queen et al. patents, the failure to acquire additional sources of revenue, the payment of dividends or distributions to our stockholders and failure to meet analyst expectations.

Our revenues consist almost entirely of royalties from licensees of our Queen et al. patents, which finally expire in December of 2014. The continued payment of dividends or distributions to our stockholders without other revenue sources and the approaching patent expiration will likely reduce the price of our common stock. If the price of our common stock were to fall below NASDAQ listing standards, our common stock may be delisted. If our common stock were delisted, market liquidity for our common stock could be severely affected and our stockholders’ ability to sell securities in the secondary market could be limited. Delisting from NASDAQ would negatively affect the value of our common stock. Delisting could also have other negative results, including, but not limited to, the potential loss of confidence by employees, the loss of institutional investor interest and fewer business development opportunities.


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Our revenues in Europe depend on the validity and enforceability of our SPCs and an adverse judgment would severely reduce our future revenues.
 
Our ‘216B Patent in Europe was granted in 1996 by the European Patent Office. The ‘216B Patent expired on December 28, 2009. To extend the period of enforceability of the ‘216B Patent against specific products which received marketing approval in Europe as of the expiration date of the ‘216B Patent, we applied for SPCs in various European national patent offices to cover the SPC Products to the extent these products are made and/or sold in Europe. These SPCs generally expire in 2014.

While our SPCs extend the period of enforceability of our ‘216B Patent against the SPC Products, their enforcement will be subject to varying, complex and evolving national requirements and standards relevant to enforcement of patent claims pursuant to SPCs. In the event that our SPCs are challenged in the national patent offices or national courts of the various countries in Europe in which we own granted SPCs, such a challenge could be directed against the validity of the SPC, the validity of the underlying patent claims, whether the product named in the SPC is protected by the underlying patent in accordance with controlling European law and/or whether the SPC was properly granted pursuant to controlling European law. Such a proceeding would involve complex legal and factual questions. In addition, the European Court of Justice has the authority to interpret the SPC regulation and could do so in a manner that materially impacts the enforceability of our SPCs against the SPC Products. As a result of these factors, we are unable to predict the extent of protection afforded by our SPCs.
 
Based on information provided to us in the quarterly royalty statements from our licensees, the royalties we collect on sales of the SPC Products approximated 43% , 38% and 33% of our royalty revenues for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 . Our inability to collect those royalties would have a material negative impact on our cash flow, our ability to pay dividends in the future and our ability to service our debt obligations. An adverse decision could also encourage challenges to our related Queen et al. patents in other jurisdictions including the United States. For further information, see “Item 3—Legal Proceedings.”
 
We depend on our licensees for the determination of royalty payments. While we have rights to audit our licensees and borrowers, the independent auditors may have difficulty determining the correct royalty calculation, we may not be able to detect errors and payment calculations may call for retroactive adjustments. We may have to exercise legal remedies to resolve any disputes resulting from the audit.
 
The royalty payments we receive are determined by our licensees based on their reported sales. Each licensee's calculation of the royalty payments is subject to and dependent upon the adequacy and accuracy of its sales and accounting functions, and errors may occur from time to time in the calculations made by a licensee. Our license and credit agreements provide us the right to audit the calculations and sales data for the associated royalty payments; however, such audits may occur many months following our recognition of the royalty revenue, may require us to adjust our royalty revenues in later periods and may require expense on the part of the Company. Further, our licensees and borrowers may be uncooperative or have insufficient records, which may complicate and delay the audit process.
 
Although we regularly exercise our royalty audit rights, we rely in the first instance on our licensees to accurately report sales and calculate and pay applicable royalties and, upon exercise of such royalty audit rights, we rely on licensees' cooperation in performing such audits. In the absence of such cooperation, we may be forced to exercise legal remedies to enforce our agreements.

We derive a significant portion of our royalty revenues from Genentech and our future success depends on continued market acceptance of their products and approval of their licensed products that are in development, as well as continued performance by Genentech of its obligations under its agreements with us.
 
Our revenues consist almost entirely of royalties from licensees of our Queen et al. patents of which the Genentech Products accounted for 83% , 85% and 86% of our revenues for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , respectively. Our future success, at least prior to the expiration of the Queen et al. patents, depends upon the continued market acceptance of the Genentech Products and upon the ability of Genentech to develop, introduce and deliver products that achieve and sustain market acceptance. We have no control over the sales efforts of Genentech and our other licensees, and our licensees might not be successful. Reductions in the sales volume or average selling price of Genentech Products could have a material adverse effect on our business.
 
In addition, our business and results of operations also depend on Genentech continuing to perform its obligations under its license agreements with us.


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Our licensees, borrowers and royalty-agreement counterparties may be unable to maintain regulatory approvals for currently licensed products, or to obtain regulatory approvals for new products, and they may voluntarily remove currently licensed products from marketing and commercial distribution. Any of such events, whether due to safety issues or other factors, could reduce our revenues.
 
Our licensees, borrowers and royalty-agreement counterparties are subject to stringent regulation with respect to product safety and efficacy by various international, federal, state and local authorities. Of particular significance are the FDA requirements covering research and development, testing, manufacturing, quality control, labeling and promotion of drugs for human use in the United States. As a result of these requirements, the length of time, the level of expenditures and the laboratory and clinical information required for approval of a biologic license application or new drug application are substantial and can require a number of years. In addition, even if our licensees’, borrowers' and royalty-agreement counterparties' products receive regulatory approval, they remain subject to ongoing FDA and other international regulations including, but not limited to, obligations to conduct additional clinical trials or other testing, changes to the product label, new or revised regulatory requirements for manufacturing practices, written advisements to physicians and/or a product recall or withdrawal. Our licensees, borrowers and royalty-agreement counterparties may not maintain necessary regulatory approvals for their existing licensed products or our licensees may not obtain necessary regulatory approvals on a timely basis, if at all, for any of the licensed products our licensees are developing or manufacturing. The occurrence of adverse events reported by any licensee, borrower or royalty-agreement counterparty may result in the revocation of regulatory approvals or decreased sales of the applicable product due to a change in physicians’ willingness to prescribe, or patients’ willingness to use the applicable product.   Our licensees, borrowers and royalty-agreement counterparties could also choose to voluntarily remove their licensed products from marketing and commercial distribution. In any of these cases, our revenues could be materially and adversely affected. For example, in November 2011, the FDA removed the indication for breast cancer from Avastin’s label. In 2005, Tysabri, was temporarily suspended and then returned to the market. In such cases, our revenues could be materially and adversely affected.

In addition, the current regulatory framework could change, or additional regulations could arise at any stage during our licensees’ product development or marketing which may affect our licensees’ ability to obtain or maintain approval of their licensed products. Delays in our licensees receiving regulatory approval for licensed products or their failure to maintain existing regulatory approvals could have a material adverse effect on our business.
 
Our licensees, borrowers and royalty-agreement counterparties face competition.
 
Our licensees, borrowers and royalty-agreement counterparties face competition from other pharmaceutical, biotechnology, device and diagnostic companies. The introduction of new competitive products may result in lost market share for our licensees, borrowers and royalty-agreement counterparties, reduced use of their products, lower prices and/or reduced product sales, any of which could reduce our royalty revenues, or the revenues on which we rely to produce the returns on our acquisitions, and have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.
 
Our current and future acquisitions of other material income generating asset transactions may not produce anticipated revenues, and if such transactions are secured by collateral, we may be, or may become, undersecured by the collateral or such collateral may lose value and we will not be able recuperate our capital expenditures in the acquisition.

We are engaged in a continual review of opportunities to acquire income generating assets, whether royalty based or otherwise, or to acquire companies that hold royalty assets. We currently, and generally at any time, have acquisition opportunities in various stages of active review, including, for example, our engagement of consultants and advisors to analyze particular opportunities, technical, financial and other confidential information, submission of indications of interest and involvement as a bidder in competitive auctions. Many potential acquisition targets do not meet our criteria, and for those that do, we may face significant competition for these acquisitions from other royalty buyers and enterprises. Competition for future asset acquisition opportunities in our markets could increase the price we pay for such assets and could reduce the number of potential acquisition targets. The success of our income generating asset acquisitions is based on our ability to make accurate assumptions regarding the valuation, timing and amount of payments. The failure of any of these acquisitions to produce anticipated revenues may materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Some of these income generating acquisitions expose us to credit risk in the event of default by the counterparty. To mitigate this risk, on occasion, we may obtain a security interest as collateral in the assets of such counterparty. Our credit risk in respect of such counterparty may be exacerbated when the collateral held by us cannot be realized upon or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount we are due pursuant to the terms of the particular income generating assets. This could occur in circumstances where the original collateral was not sufficient to cover a complete loss (e.g., our interests were only partially secured) or may result from the deterioration in value of the collateral, so that, in either such case, we are unable to recuperate our

20



full capital outlay. Any such losses resulting therefrom could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
 
Many of our potential income generating investments are in companies or assets that have limited commercialized revenue-generating products, which may negatively impact our investment returns.

In anticipation of the expiration of our Queen et al. patents, we have made and will likely continue to make investments in income-generating assets, such as loans in exchange for a profit share or royalty streams, in the healthcare industries, many of which investments are in companies that, at the time of investment, have limited or no commercialized revenue-generating products. If the assets are not successfully commercialized, the value of our investments will be negatively affected. The ultimate success of our investments in many of our potential revenue generating assets in these industries will depend on the ability of the counterparty to innovate, develop and commercialize their products, in increasingly competitive and highly regulated markets. Their inability to do so would negatively affect our investment. In addition, in connection with many of our potential income-generating investments, we are dependent, to a large extent, on third parties to enforce certain rights for our benefit. For example, we acquired certain royalty rights from Depomed, which, as the licensor of certain patents, retains various rights, including the contractual right to audit its licensees and to ensure those licensees are complying with the terms of the underlying license agreements. Depomed also retains full responsibility to protect and maintain the intellectual property rights underlying the licenses. While we have contractual rights to require Depomed to take action regarding many of these rights, because Depomed’s economic interest in the license agreements is limited, it may not enforce or protect those rights as it otherwise would have had it retained the full economic interest in the payments under the license agreements. Moreover, in respect of the royalty stream relating to the Glumetza diabetes medication that we acquired from Depomed, which is the royalty right producing the highest revenues from the Depomed acquired royalties, U.S. patent protection for this product is expected to begin to expire in September 2016, and under settlement agreements to which Depomed is a party, certain manufacturers of generic products will be permitted to enter the market starting in February and August 2016.

The lack of liquidity in our acquisitions may adversely affect our business and, if we need to sell any of our acquired assets, we may not be able to do so at a favorable price. As a result, we may suffer losses.

We generally acquire in patents, royalty rights and debt instruments that have limited secondary resale markets. The illiquidity of most of our assets may make it difficult for us to dispose of them at a favorable price and, as a result, we may suffer losses if we are required to dispose of any or all such assets in a liquidation or otherwise. In addition, if we liquidate all or a portion of our assets quickly or in connection with a liquidation, we may realize significantly less than the value at which we had previously recorded these assets.

We may use a certain amount of cash from time to time in order to satisfy the obligations relating to our convertible notes. The maturity or conversion of any of our convertible notes may adversely affect our financial condition and operating results, which could adversely affect the amount or timing of dividends to our stockholders.
 
As of December 31, 2013 , $180.0 million in principal remained outstanding under our Series 2012 Notes and $155.3 million in principal remained outstanding under our May 2015 Notes. At maturity, we will have to pay the holders of such notes the full aggregate principal amount of the convertible notes, then outstanding. For example, on February 15, 2015, we will have to pay the full aggregate principal amount of our Series 2012 Notes, $180.0 million as of December 31, 2013 .
 
Holders of the May 2015 Notes and Series 2012 Notes may convert their notes at their option under the following circumstances: (i) during any fiscal quarter commencing after the fiscal quarter ending June 30, 2011, in the case of our May 2015 Notes, and December 31, 2011, in the case of our Series 2012 Notes, if the last reported sale price of our common stock for at least 20 trading days in a period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on the last trading day of the immediately preceding fiscal quarter exceeds 130% of the conversion price for the notes on the last day of such preceding fiscal quarter; (ii) during the five business-day period immediately after any five consecutive trading-day period, which we refer to as the measurement period, in which the trading price per $1,000 principal amount of notes for each trading day of that measurement period was less than 98% of the product of the last reported sale price of our common stock and the conversion rate for the notes for each such day; or (iii) upon the occurrence of specified corporate events. The holders of the May 2015 Notes and Series 2012 Notes may convert their notes at their option during the quarter ended March 31, 2014, as the last reported sale price of our common stock for at least 20 trading days in the period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on December 31, 2013, exceeded 130% of the conversion price for the notes. On and after November 1, 2014, in the case of our May 2015 Notes, and August 15, 2014, in the case of our Series 2012 Notes, holders may convert their notes at any time, regardless of the foregoing circumstances. These notes are net-share settled. If one or more holders elect to convert their notes when conversion is permitted, we would be required to make cash payments to satisfy up to the face value of our conversion obligation in respect of each note, which could adversely affect our liquidity. In

21



addition, even if holders do not elect to convert their May 2015 Notes or Series 2012 Notes, because our May 2015 Notes and Series 2012 Notes are net share settled, we could be required under applicable accounting rules to reclassify all or a portion of the outstanding principal of our May 2015 Notes and Series 2012 Notes as a current rather than long-term liability, which could result in a material reduction of our net working capital.
 
We may use a certain amount of cash from time to time in order to satisfy these repurchase or other obligations relating to the convertible notes which could adversely affect the amount or timing of any distribution to our stockholders or any income generating transactions. In addition, we may redeem (except in the case of our Series 2012 Notes that are unredeemable by us), repurchase or otherwise acquire the convertible notes in the open market in the future, any of which could adversely affect the amount or timing of any cash distribution to our stockholders.
 
The conversion or any future exchanges of any of our May 2015 Notes or our Series 2012 Notes into shares of our common stock would have a dilutive effect that could cause our stock price to go down.
 
Our May 2015 Notes, until November 1, 2014, and our Series 2012 Notes, until August 15, 2014, are convertible into shares of our common stock only if specified conditions are met and thereafter convertible at any time, at the option of the holder. We have reserved shares of our authorized common stock for issuance upon conversion of these convertible notes. Upon conversion, the principal amount is due in cash, and to the extent that the conversion value exceeds the principal amount, the difference is due in shares of common stock. If any or all of these convertible notes are converted into shares of our common stock, our existing stockholders will experience immediate dilution of voting rights and our common stock price may decline. Furthermore, the perception that such dilution could occur may cause the market price of our common stock to decline.
 
The conversion rate as of December 31, 2013 , for our Series 2012 Notes is 182.598 shares of common stock per $1,000 principal amount or a conversion price of approximately $5.48 per share of common stock and the conversion rate for our May 2015 Notes is 159.9165 shares of common stock per $1,000 principal amount, or a conversion price of approximately $6.25 per share of common stock. Because the conversion rates of these convertible notes adjust upward upon the occurrence of certain events, such as a dividend payment, our existing stockholders may experience more dilution if any or all of these convertible notes are converted into shares of our common stock after the adjusted conversion rates became effective.
 
We entered into purchased call option and warrant transactions in connection with the issuance of our May 2015 Notes and February 2018 Notes that may affect the value of our common stock.
 
In connection with the issuance of our May 2015 Notes and February 2018 Notes, we entered into purchased call option transactions. Separately, we also entered into warrant transactions at that time. The purchased call option transactions are expected to reduce the potential dilution with respect to our common stock upon conversion of our May 2015 Notes and February 2018 Notes. The warrant transactions could separately have a dilutive effect from the issuance of our common stock pursuant to the warrants.

The purchased call option and warrant transactions are accounted for as an adjustment to our stockholders’ equity (deficit). In connection with hedging these transactions, the counterparties to the hedge transactions or their respective affiliates may enter into, or may unwind, various derivative transactions and/or purchase or sell our common stock in secondary market transactions prior to maturity of our May 2015 Notes and February 2018 Notes (and are likely to do so during any cash settlement averaging period related to any conversion of our May 2015 Notes and February 2018 Notes). Such activities could have the effect of decreasing the trading price of our common stock during any cash settlement averaging period related to a conversion of our May 2015 Notes and February 2018 Notes.

In addition, we intend to exercise the purchased call options whenever May 2015 Notes and February 2018 Notes are converted, if ever. In order to unwind their hedge positions with respect to those exercised options, the hedge counterparties or their respective affiliates may sell shares of our common stock in secondary market transactions or unwind various derivative transactions with respect to our common stock during the cash settlement averaging period for the converted notes. The effect, if any, of any of these transactions and activities on the trading price of our common stock will depend, in part, on market conditions and cannot be ascertained at this time, but any of these activities could adversely affect the value of our common stock.
 
Further, a failure by the hedge counterparties or their respective affiliates (due to bankruptcy or otherwise) to pay or deliver, as the case may be, amounts owed to us under the purchased call option transactions will not reduce the consideration we are required to deliver to a holder upon its conversion of our May 2015 Notes and February 2018 Notes and may result in an increase in dilution with respect to our common stock.
 

22



Changes in the third-party reimbursement environment may affect product sales from which we receive royalty revenues.
 
Sales of products from which we receive royalties and our borrowers generate revenues will depend significantly on the extent to which reimbursement for the cost of such products and related treatments will be available to physicians and patients from various levels of U.S. and international government health authorities, private health insurers and other organizations. Third-party payers and government health administration authorities increasingly attempt to limit and/or regulate the reimbursement of medical products and services, including branded prescription drugs. Changes in government legislation or regulation, such as the Affordable Care Act; the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010; the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2009 and the Medicare, Medicaid and State Children’s Health Insurance Program Extension Act of 2007 and changes in formulary or compendia listing or changes in private third-party payers’ policies toward reimbursement for such products may reduce reimbursement of the cost of such products to physicians, pharmacies and distributors. Decreases in third-party reimbursement could reduce usage of such products and sales to collaborators, which may have a material adverse effect on our royalties and the revenues of our borrowers. In addition, macroeconomic factors may affect the ability of patients to pay or co-pay for costs or otherwise pay for products from which we generate royalties and our borrowers generate revenues by, for example, decreasing the number of patients covered by insurance policies or increasing costs associated with such policies.
 
  Our revenues, cash flows and operating results will likely fluctuate in future periods.
 
Our revenues and income may be unpredictable and fluctuate because they depend upon, among other things, the rate of growth of our royalties and the timing of interest and principal payments, as well as early repayment of our notes receivable. To protect unpredictable and fluctuating cash flows, we may need to carry additional cash on our balance sheet at very low interest rates or enter into short-term financings, such as our Term Loan.
 
Until August 15, 2013, the Genentech agreement provided for a tiered royalty structure. The royalty rate Genentech paid on 95% of the underlying gross U.S.-based Sales in a given calendar year decreased on incremental U.S.-based Sales above certain net sales thresholds. As a result of the tiered royalty structure, Genentech’s average annual royalty rate for a given year declined as Genentech’s U.S.-based Sales increase during that year. Because we receive royalties one quarter in arrears, the average royalty rate for the payments we received from Genentech in the second calendar quarter, which would be for Genentech’s sales from the first calendar quarter, were higher than the average royalty rate for following quarters. The average royalty rate for payments we received from Genentech were generally lowest in the fourth quarter and first calendar quarter of the following year, which would be for Genentech’s sales from the third and fourth calendar quarter, when Genentech’s U.S.-based Sales bore royalties at a 1% royalty rate. With respect to the ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales, the royalty rate that we received from Genentech was a fixed rate of 3% based on 95% of the underlying gross ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales. The mix of U.S.-based Sales and ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales fluctuated in the past.
 
We may experience increases and decreases in our royalty revenues due to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates and we may be unsuccessful in our attempts to mitigate this risk.
 
A material portion of our royalties are calculated based on sales in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Fluctuations in foreign currency rates, particularly the Euro, relative to the U.S. dollar can significantly affect our revenues and operating results. While foreign currency conversion terms vary by license agreement, generally most agreements require that royalties first be calculated in the currency of sale and then converted into U.S. dollars using the average daily exchange rates for that currency for a specified period at the end of the calendar quarter. For example, when the U.S. dollar weakens in relation to other currencies, the converted amount is greater than it would have been had the U.S. dollar exchange rates remained unchanged. More than 50% of our licensees’ product sales are in currencies other than U.S. dollars; as such, our revenues may fluctuate due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates and is subject to foreign currency exchange risk. For example, in a quarter in which we generate $70 million in royalty revenues and when approximately $35 million is based on sales in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, if the U.S. dollar strengthens across all currencies by 10% during the conversion period for that quarter, when compared to the same amount of local currency royalties for the prior year, U.S. dollar converted royalties will be approximately $3.5 million less in the current quarter than in the prior year.
 
To compensate for Euro currency fluctuations, we hedge Euro currency exposures with Euro forward and option contracts, to offset the risks associated with these Euro currency exposures. We may suspend the use of these contracts from time to time or we may be unsuccessful in our attempt to hedge our Euro currency risk. We will continue to experience foreign currency related fluctuations in our royalty revenues in certain instances when we do not enter into foreign currency exchange contracts or where it is not possible or cost effective to hedge our foreign currency related exposures. Currency related fluctuations in our royalty revenues will vary based on the currency exchange rates associated with these exposures and changes in those rates, whether we have entered into foreign currency exchange contracts to offset these exposures and other factors. All of these factors could

23



materially impact our results of operations, financial position and cash flows, the timing of which is variable and generally outside of our control.
  
We must attract, retain and integrate key employees in order to succeed. It may be difficult to recruit, retain and integrate key employees.
 
To be successful, we must attract, retain and integrate qualified personnel. Our business is intellectual property asset management, investing in income generating assets and maximizing the value of our patent portfolio and related assets, which requires only a small number of employees. Due to the potential short-term nature and remote location of our company, it may be difficult for us to recruit and retain qualified personnel. If we are unsuccessful in attracting, retaining and integrating qualified personnel, our business could be impaired.
 
Our agreements with Facet may not reflect terms that would have resulted from arm’s-length negotiations between unaffiliated third parties.
 
The agreements associated with the Spin-Off of Facet in December 2008, including the Separation and Distribution Agreement, Tax Sharing and Indemnification Agreement and Cross License Agreement, were negotiated in the context of the Spin-Off while Facet was still part of PDL and, accordingly, may not reflect more favorable terms that may have resulted from arm’s-length negotiations between unaffiliated third parties.
 
We may have obligations for which we may not be able to collect under our indemnification rights from Facet.
 
Under the terms of the Separation and Distribution agreement with Facet, we and Facet agreed to indemnify the other from and after the Spin-Off with respect to certain indebtedness, liabilities and obligations that were retained by our respective companies. These indemnification obligations could be significant. The ability to satisfy these indemnities, if called upon to do so, will depend upon the future financial strength of each of our companies. We cannot assure you that, if Facet has to indemnify us for any substantial obligations, Facet will have the ability to satisfy those obligations. If Facet does not have the ability to satisfy those obligations, we may be required to satisfy those obligations instead. For example, in connection with the Spin-Off, we entered into amendments to the leases for the facilities in Redwood City, California, which formerly served as our corporate headquarters, under which Facet was added as a co-tenant under the leases and a Co-Tenancy Agreement under which Facet agreed to indemnify us for all matters related to the leases attributable to the period after the Spin-Off date. Should Facet default under its lease obligations, we would be held liable by the landlord as a co-tenant and, thus, we have in substance guaranteed the payments under the lease agreements for the Redwood City facilities, the disposition of which could have a material adverse effect on the amount or timing of any distribution to our stockholders. As of December 31, 2013 , the total lease payments for the duration of the guarantee, which runs through December 2021, are approximately $90.2 million . We would also be responsible for lease related payments including utilities, property taxes and common area maintenance which may be as much as the actual lease payments. In April 2010, Abbott Laboratories acquired Facet and renamed the company Abbott Biotherapeutics Corp., and in January 2013, Abbott Biotherapeutics Corp. was renamed AbbVie Biotherapeutics, Inc. and spun off from Abbott as a subsidiary of AbbVie Inc. We do not know how Abbott’s acquisition of Facet will impact our ability to collect under our indemnification rights or whether Facet’s ability to satisfy its obligations will change. In addition, we have limited information rights under the Co-Tenancy Agreement. As a result, we are unable to determine definitively whether Facet continues to occupy the space and whether it has subleased the space to another party. See “Item 2—Properties.”

ITEM 1B.        UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
None.
 
ITEM 2.           PROPERTIES

We lease approximately 4,800 square feet of office space in Incline Village, Nevada, which serves as our corporate headquarters. The lease expires in May 2014 . We may, at our option, extend the term of this lease.
  
In July 2006, we entered into two leases and a sublease for the facilities in Redwood City, California, which formerly served as our corporate headquarters and cover approximately 450,000 square feet of office space. Under the amendments to the leases entered into in connection with the Spin-Off, Facet was added as a co-tenant under the leases. As a co-tenant, Facet is bound by all of the terms and conditions of the leases. PDL and Facet are jointly and severally liable for all obligations under the leases, including the payment of rental obligations. However, we also entered into a Co-Tenancy Agreement with Facet in connection with the Spin-Off and the lease amendments under which we assigned to Facet all rights under the leases, including, but not

24



limited to, the right to amend the leases, extend the lease term or terminate the leases, and Facet assumed all of our obligations under the leases. Under the Co-Tenancy Agreement, we also relinquished any right or option to regain possession, use or occupancy of these facilities. Facet agreed to indemnify us for all matters associated with the leases attributable to the period after the Spin-Off date and we agreed to indemnify Facet for all matters associated with the leases attributable to the period before the Spin-Off date. In addition, in connection with the Spin-Off, the sublease was assigned by PDL to Facet. In April 2010, Abbot laboratories acquired Facet and later renamed the entity AbbVie Biotheraputics, Inc. To date, AbbVie has satisfied all obligations under the Redwood City lease.
 
ITEM 3.           LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
Genentech / Roche Matter

Settlement Agreement

We entered into a master patent license agreement, effective September 25, 1998, under which we granted Genentech a license under our Queen et al. patents to make, use and sell certain antibody products.

On January 31, 2014, we entered into a settlement agreement with Genentech and Roche which resolves all outstanding legal disputes between the parties, including our Nevada litigation with Genentech relating to an August 2010 facsimile sent by Genentech on behalf of Roche and Novartis asserting its products do not infringe on PDL’s SPC’s, and our arbitration proceedings with Genentech related to the audit of royalties on sales.

Under the terms of the Settlement Agreement, effective retroactively to August 15, 2013, Genentech will pay a fixed royalty rate of 2.125 percent on worldwide sales of all its licensed products, as compared to the previous tiered royalty rate in the U.S and the fixed rate on all ex-U.S. based manufactured and sold licensed products. Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Genentech and Roche confirmed that Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair and Perjeta are licensed products as defined in the relevant license agreements between the parties, and further agreed that Kadcyla and Gazyva are licensed products. Genentech will pay these royalties on all worldwide sales of Avastin, Herceptin, Xolair, Perjeta and Kadcyla occurring on or before December 31, 2015. With respect to Lucentis, Genentech will owe no royalties on U.S. sales occurring after June 30, 2013, and will pay a royalty of 2.125 percent on all ex-U.S. sales occurring on or before December 28, 2014. The royalty term for Gazyva remains unchanged from the existing license agreement pertaining thereto.

The Settlement Agreement precludes Genentech and Roche from challenging the validity of PDL’s patents, including its SPCs in Europe, from contesting their obligation to pay royalties, from contesting patent coverage for Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair, Perjeta, Kadcyla and Gazyva and from assisting or encouraging any third party in challenging PDL’s patents and SPCs. The Settlement Agreement further outlines the conduct of any audits initiated by PDL of the books and records of Genentech in an effort to ensure a full and fair audit procedure. Finally, the agreement clarifies that the sales amounts from which the royalties are calculated does not include certain taxes and discounts.

The Settlement Agreement provides greater certainty for each of the parties in terms of the royalty rate payable under the agreement and the period over which they will be payable. PDL expects to recognize royalty revenue on the licensed products until the first quarter of 2016. Additionally, the settlement terms provide for a better definition of revenues and audit inspection procedures related to the arbitration dispute filed by PDL.

Other Legal Proceedings

In addition, from time to time, we may be subject to various other legal proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business and which we do not expect to materially impact our financial statements.


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ITEM 4.           MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
 
Not applicable.
 

26



PART II
 
ITEM 5.           MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Our common stock trades on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “PDLI.” Prices indicated below are the high and low intra-day sales prices per share of our common stock as reported by the NASDAQ Global Select Market for the periods indicated.

 
High
 
Low
2013
 
 
 
First Quarter
$
7.58

 
$
6.50

Second Quarter
$
8.48

 
$
7.22

Third Quarter
$
8.45

 
$
7.63

Fourth Quarter
$
10.21

 
$
7.52

2012
 
 
 
First Quarter
$
6.60

 
$
6.00

Second Quarter
$
6.68

 
$
6.03

Third Quarter
$
7.86

 
$
6.49

Fourth Quarter
$
8.43

 
$
6.95


As of February 14, 2014 , we had approximatel y 136 co mmon stockholders of reco rd. Most of our outstanding shares of common stock are held of record by one stockholder, Cede & Co., as nominee for the Depository Trust Company. Ma ny brokers, banks and other institutions hold shares of common stock as nominees for beneficial owners which deposit these shares of common stock in participant accounts at the Depository Trust Company. The actual number of beneficial owners of our stock is likely significantly greater than the number of stockholders of record; however, we are unable to reasonably estimate the total number of beneficial owners.
 
At the beginning of each fiscal year, our board of directors reviews the Company’s total annual dividend payment for the prior year and determines whether to increase, maintain or decrease the quarterly dividend payments for that year. The board of directors evaluates the financial condition of the Company and considers the economic outlook, corporate cash flow, the Company’s liquidity needs and the health and stability of credit markets when determining whether to maintain or change the dividend.
 
On January 29, 2014 , our board of directors declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.15 per share of common stock on March 12, June 12, September 12 and December 12 of 2014 to stockholders of record on March 5, June 5, September 5 and December 5 of 2014 , the record dates for each of the dividend payments, respectively.
 
On January 23, 2013, our board of directors declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.15 per share of common stock. On March 12, June 12, September 12 and December 12 of 2013, we paid quarterly cash dividends of approximately $21.0 million or $0.15 per share to stockholders of record on March 5, June 5, September 5 and December 5 of 2013, the record dates for each of the dividend payments, respectively.

On January 18, 2012 , our board of directors declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.15 per share of common stock. On March 14, June 14, September 14 and December 14 of 2012 , we paid quarterly cash dividends of approximately $21.0 million or $0.15 per share to stockholders of record on March 7, June 7, September 7 and December 7 of 2012 , the record dates for each of the dividend payments, respectively.
 
Comparison of Stockholder Returns
 
The line graph below compares the cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock between December 31, 2008 , and December 31, 2013 , with the cumulative total return of (i) the NASDAQ Biotechnology Index and (ii) the NASDAQ Composite Index over the same period. This graph assumes that $100.00 was invested on December 31, 2008 , in our common stock at the closing sales price for our common stock on that date and at the closing sales price for each index on that date and that all

27



dividends were reinvested. Stockholder returns over the indicated period should not be considered indicative of future stockholder returns and are not intended to be a forecast.

 
 
12/31/2008
 
12/31/2009
 
12/31/2010
 
12/31/2011
 
12/31/2012
 
12/31/2013
PDL BioPharma, Inc.
$
100.00

 
$
157.96

 
$
168.36

 
$
185.28

 
$
229.38

 
$
296.66

Nasdaq Biotechnology Index
$
100.00

 
$
144.88

 
$
170.58

 
$
171.30

 
$
199.99

 
$
283.39

Nasdaq Composite Index
$
100.00

 
$
104.67

 
$
112.89

 
$
127.04

 
$
169.50

 
$
288.38


The information in this section shall not be deemed to be “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate it by reference in such filing.
 

28



ITEM 6.           SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
The following selected consolidated financial information has been derived from our consolidated financial statements. The information below is not necessarily indicative of the results of future operations and should be read in conjunction with Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and Item 1A, “Risk Factors,” of this Form 10-K and the consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto included in Item 8 of this Form 10-K in order to fully understand factors that may affect the comparability of the information presented below.
 
Consolidated Statements of Income Data

 
 
For the Years Ended December 31,
(In thousands, except per share data)
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Royalties
 
$
441,421

 
$
374,525

 
$
351,641

 
$
343,475

 
$
305,049

License and other
 
1,500

 

 
10,400

 
1,500

 
13,135

Total revenues
 
442,921

 
374,525

 
362,041

 
344,975

 
318,184

Cost of royalty revenues (amortization of intangible assets)
 
5,637

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses
 
29,755

 
25,469

 
18,338

 
41,396

 
21,064

Accrued legal settlement expense
 

 

 

 
92,500

 

Operating income
 
407,529

 
349,056

 
343,703

 
211,079

 
297,120

Non-operating income (expense), net
 
(5,653
)
 
(21,923
)
 
(36,275
)
 
(60,709
)
 
(16,835
)
Income before income taxes
 
401,876

 
327,133

 
307,428

 
150,370

 
280,285

Income tax expense
 
137,346

 
115,464

 
108,039

 
58,496

 
90,625

Net income
 
$
264,530

 
$
211,669

 
$
199,389

 
$
91,874

 
$
189,660

Net income per basic share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
1.89

 
$
1.52

 
$
1.43

 
$
0.73

 
$
1.59

Net income per diluted share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
1.66

 
$
1.45

 
$
1.15

 
$
0.54

 
$
1.07

Dividends per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash dividends declared and paid
 
$
0.60

 
$
0.60

 
$
0.60

 
$
1.00

 
$
2.67


Consolidated Balance Sheet Data
 
 
December 31,
(In thousands)
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Cash, cash equivalents, investments and restricted investments
 
$
99,540

 
$
168,689

 
$
227,946

 
$
248,229

 
$
303,227

Working capital
 
$
(299,727
)
 
$
172,511

 
$
100,506

 
$
90,672

 
$
22,320

Total assets
 
$
543,955

 
$
279,966

 
$
269,471

 
$
316,666

 
$
338,411

Long-term obligations, less current portion
 
$
23,042

 
$
337,614

 
$
340,737

 
$
446,857

 
$
460,848

Retained earnings (accumulated deficit)
 
$
350,151

 
$
169,634

 
$
(42,035
)
 
$
(241,424
)
 
$
(333,298
)
Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)
 
$
113,489

 
$
(68,122
)
 
$
(204,273
)
 
$
(324,182
)
 
$
(415,953
)


29



ITEM 7.           MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
Overview
 
PDL BioPharma manages a portfolio of patents and royalty assets, consisting primarily of its Queen et al. antibody humanization patents and license agreements with various biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. PDL pioneered the humanization of monoclonal antibodies and, by doing so, enabled the discovery of a new generation of targeted treatments for cancer and immunologic diseases for which it receives significant royalty revenue. PDL is currently focused on intellectual property asset management, acquiring in new income generating assets and maximizing value for its shareholders.

The company was formerly known as Protein Design Labs, Inc. and changed its name to PDL BioPharma, Inc. in 2006. PDL was founded in 1986 and is headquartered in Incline Village, Nevada.

In 2011, PDL initiated a strategy to bring in new income generating assets from the healthcare sector. To accomplish this goal, PDL seeks to provide non-dilutive growth capital and financing solutions to late stage public and private healthcare companies and offers immediate financial monetization of royalty streams to companies, academic institutions and inventors. PDL continues to pursue this strategic initiative for which it has already invested approximately $500 million to date. PDL is focused on the quality of the income generating assets and potential returns on investment.

We continuously evaluate alternatives to increase return for our stockholders, for example, purchasing income generating assets, buying back or redeeming our convertible notes, repurchasing our common stock, paying dividends or selling the Company. At the beginning of each fiscal year, our board of directors reviews the Company's total annual dividend payment for the prior year and determines whether to increase, maintain or decrease the quarterly dividend payments for that year. The board of directors evaluates the financial condition of the Company and considers the economic outlook, corporate cash flow, the Company's liquidity needs and the health and stability of credit markets when determining whether to maintain or change the dividend.

Recent Developments
 
Update to Challenges against the Queen et al. Patents in the United States and Europe
 
Genentech / Roche Matter

Settlement Agreement

On January 31, 2014, we entered into a settlement agreement with Genentech and Roche which resolves all outstanding legal disputes between the parties, including our Nevada litigation with Genentech relating to an August 2010 facsimile sent by Genentech on behalf of Roche and Novartis asserting its products do not infringe on PDL’s SPC’s, and our arbitration proceedings with Genentech related to the audit of royalties on sales.

Under the terms of the Settlement Agreement, effective retroactively to August 15, 2013, Genentech will pay a fixed royalty rate of 2.125 percent on worldwide sales of all its licensed products, as compared to the previous tiered royalty rate in the U.S and the fixed rate on all ex-U.S. based manufactured and sold licensed products. Pursuant to the agreement, Genentech and Roche confirmed that Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair and Perjeta are licensed products as defined in the relevant license agreements between the parties, and further agreed that Kadcyla and Gazyva are licensed products. Genentech will pay these royalties on all worldwide sales of Avastin, Herceptin, Xolair, Perjeta and Kadcyla occurring on or before December 31, 2015. With respect to Lucentis, Genentech will owe no royalties on U.S. sales occurring after June 30, 2013, and will pay a royalty of 2.125 percent on all ex-U.S. sales occurring on or before December 28, 2014. The royalty term for Gazyva remains unchanged from the existing license agreement pertaining thereto.

The agreement precludes Genentech and Roche from challenging the validity of PDL’s patents, including its SPCs in Europe, from contesting their obligation to pay royalties, from contesting patent coverage for Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair, Perjeta, Kadcyla and Gazyva and from assisting or encouraging any third party in challenging PDL’s patents and SPCs. The agreement further outlines the conduct of any audits initiated by PDL of the books and records of Genentech in an effort to ensure a full and fair audit procedure. Finally, the agreement clarifies that the sales amounts from which the royalties are calculated does not include certain taxes and discounts.


30



The settlement agreement provides greater certainty for each of the parties in terms of the royalty rate payable under the agreement and the period over which they will be payable. PDL expects to recognize royalty revenue on the licensed products until the first quarter of 2016. Additionally, the settlement terms provide for a better definition of revenues and audit inspection procedures related to the arbitration dispute filed by PDL.

Notes and Other Long-term Receivables

Wellstat Diagnostics Note Receivable and Credit Agreement

In March 2012, the Company executed a $7.5 million two-year senior secured note receivable with the holders of the equity interests in Wellstat Diagnostics. In addition to bearing interest at 10% per annum, the note gave PDL certain rights to negotiate for certain future financing transactions. In August 2012, PDL and the borrowers amended the note receivable, providing a senior secured note receivable of $10.0 million, bearing interest at 12% per annum, to replace the original $7.5 million note. This $10.0 million note was repaid on November 2, 2012.

On November 2, 2012, the Company and Wellstat Diagnostics entered into a $40.0 million credit agreement pursuant to which the Company is to accrue quarterly interest payments at the rate of 5% per annum (payable in cash or in kind). In addition, PDL will receive quarterly royalty payments based on a low double digit royalty rate of Wellstat Diagnostics' net revenues, generated by the sale, distribution or other use of Wellstat Diagnostics' products, if any, commencing upon the commercialization of its products.

In January 2013, the Company was informed that, as of November 2012, Wellstat Diagnostics had used funds contrary to the terms of the credit agreement and breached Sections 2.1.2 and 7 of the credit agreement. PDL sent Wellstat Diagnostics a notice of default on January 22, 2013, and accelerated the amounts owed under the credit agreement. In connection with the notice of default, PDL exercised one of its available remedies and transferred approximately $8.1 million of available cash from a bank account of Wellstat Diagnostics to PDL and applied the funds to amounts due under the credit agreement. On February 28, 2013, the parties entered into a forbearance agreement whereby PDL agreed to refrain from exercising additional remedies for 120 days while Wellstat Diagnostics raised funds to capitalize the business and the parties attempted to negotiate a revised credit agreement. PDL agreed to provide up to $7.9 million to Wellstat Diagnostics to fund the business for the 120-day forbearance period under the terms of the forbearance agreement. Following the conclusion of the June 28 forbearance period, the Company agreed to forbear in its exercise of remedies for additional periods of time to allow the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics to complete a pending financing transaction. During such forbearance period, the Company provided approximately $1.3 million to Wellstat Diagnostics to fund ongoing operations of the business. During the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately $8.7 million was advanced pursuant to the forbearance agreement.

On August 15, 2013, the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics completed a financing transaction to fulfill its obligations under the forbearance agreement. On August 15, 2013, the Company entered into an amended and restated credit agreement with Wellstat Diagnostics. The Company determined that the new agreement should be accounted for as a modification of the existing agreement.

Except as otherwise described here, the material terms of the amended credit agreement are substantially the same as those of the original credit agreement, including quarterly interest payments at the rate of 5% per annum (payable in cash or in kind). In addition, PDL to receive quarterly royalty payments based on a low double digit royalty rate of Wellstat Diagnostics' net revenues upon successful commercialization. However, pursuant to the amended credit agreement: (i) the principal amount was reset to approximately $44.1 million which was comprised of approximately $33.7 million original loan principal and interest, $1.3 million term loan principal and interest and $9.1 million forbearance principal and interest; (ii) the specified internal rates of return increased; (iii) the default interest rate was increased; (iv) Wellstat Diagnostics' obligation to provide certain financial information increased in frequency to monthly; (v) internal financial controls were strengthened by requiring Wellstat Diagnostics to maintain an independent, third-party financial professional with control over fund disbursements; (vi) the Company waived the existing events of default; and (vii) the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics are required to contribute additional capital to Wellstat Diagnostics upon the sale, if any, of an affiliated entity. The restated credit agreement continues to have an ultimate maturity date of December 31, 2021 (but may mature earlier upon certain specified events).

When the principal amount was reset it resulted in a $2.5 million reduction of the carrying value of the note receivable which was recorded as a financing cost as a component of interest and other income, net. The new carrying value is lower as a function of the variable nature of the internal rate of return to be realized by the Company based on when the note is repaid. The internal rate of return calculation, although increased, was reset when the credit agreement was amended and restated.


31



Wellstat Diagnostics may prepay the amended credit agreement at a price that, together with interest and royalty payments already made to the Company, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company. In the event of a change of control, bankruptcy or certain other customary events of defaults, or Wellstat Diagnostics' failure to achieve a specified annual revenue threshold in 2017, Wellstat Diagnostics will be required to prepay the amended credit agreement at a price that, together with interest and royalty payments already made to the Company, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company. The amended credit agreement is secured by a pledge of all of the assets of Wellstat Diagnostics, a pledge of all of Wellstat Diagnostics’ equity interests by the holders thereof, and a second lien on the assets of the affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics.

At December 31, 2013 , and 2012 , the carrying value of the note was included in non-current assets.

As of December 31, 2013 , the Company determined that its interest in Wellstat Diagnostics represented a variable interest in a Variable Interest Entity since Wellstat Diagnostics' equity was not sufficient to finance its operations without amounts advanced to it under the Company's note and forbearance agreement. However, the Company does not have the power to direct the activities of Wellstat Diagnostics that most significantly impacts Wellstat Diagnostics economic performance and is not the primary beneficiary of Wellstat Diagnostics; therefore, Wellstat Diagnostics is not subject to consolidation.

As of December 31, 2013 , the carrying value of all amounts advanced to Wellstat Diagnostics was $47.7 million, which was recorded in notes receivable. As of December 31, 2013 , the maximum loss exposure was $47.7 million.

Merus Labs Note Receivable and Credit Agreement

In July 2012, PDL loaned $35.0 million to Merus Labs in connection with its acquisition of a commercial-stage pharmaceutical product and related assets. In addition, PDL agreed to provide a $20.0 million letter of credit on behalf of Merus Labs for the seller of the assets to draw upon to satisfy the remaining $20.0 million purchase price obligation. The seller made this draw on the letter of credit in July 2013 and an additional loan to Merus Labs for $20.0 million was recorded for an aggregate of $55.0 million in total borrowings.

Outstanding borrowings under the July 2012 loan bore interest at the rate of 13.5% per annum and outstanding borrowings as a result of the draw on the letter of credit bore interest at the rate of 14.0% per annum. Merus Labs was required to make four periodic principal payments in respect of the July 2012 loan, with repayment of the remaining principal balance of all loans due on March 31, 2015. The borrowings were subject to mandatory prepayments upon certain asset dispositions or debt issuances as set forth in the credit agreement. Merus Labs made the first of these payments in December 2012 in the amount of $5.0 million, and made the second payment in June 2013 in the amount of $7.5 million. In September 2013, Merus Labs made two additional payments totaling $43.3 million, including the prepayment fee, in order to pay its remaining outstanding balance.

In September 2013, Merus Labs prepaid in full its obligations under the credit agreement , including accrued interest through the payment date and a prepayment fee of 1% of the aggregate principal amount outstanding at the time of repayment. There was no outstanding balance owed as of December 31, 2013 .

AxoGen Royalty Agreement

In October 2012, PDL entered into the Royalty Agreement with AxoGen pursuant to which the Company will receive specified royalties on AxoGen’s net revenues (as defined in the Royalty Agreement) generated by the sale, distribution or other use of AxoGen’s products (assigned interests). The Royalty Agreement has an eight years term and provides PDL with royalties of 9.95% based on AxoGen net revenues, subject to agreed-upon guaranteed quarterly minimum payments of approximately $1.3 to $2.5 million beginning in the fourth quarter of 2014, and the right to require AxoGen to repurchase the Royalty Agreement at the end of the fourth year. AxoGen has been granted certain rights to call the contract in years five through eight. The total consideration PDL paid to AxoGen for the assigned interests was $20.8 million, including the termination of an interim funding of $1.8 million in August 2012. AxoGen was required to use a portion of the proceeds from the Royalty Agreement to pay the outstanding balance under its existing credit facility with a third party. AxoGen plans to use the remainder of the proceeds to support the business plan for its products. The royalty rights are secured by the cash and accounts receivable of AxoGen.

Under the Royalty Agreement, beginning on October 1, 2016, or in the event of the occurrence of a material adverse event or AxoGen's bankruptcy or material breach of the Royalty Agreement, the Company may require AxoGen to repurchase the assigned interests at a price that, together with payments already made by AxoGen, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company. The Company has concluded that the repurchase option is an embedded derivative which should be bifurcated and separately accounted for at fair value.


32



In the event of a change of control, AxoGen must repurchase the assigned interests from the Company for a repurchase price equal to an amount that, together with payments already made by AxoGen, would generate a 32.5% internal rate of return to the Company. The Company has concluded that the change of control provision is an embedded derivative that should be bifurcated and separately recorded at its estimated fair value. The estimated fair value of the change of control provision was approximately $1.1 million and $0.6 million as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. The estimated fair value of this embedded derivative is included in the carrying value of the AxoGen Note Receivable. The Company recognized approximately $0.5 million related to the change in the estimated fair value of embedded derivative during the year ended December 31, 2013.

At any time after September 30, 2016, AxoGen, at its option, can repurchase the assigned interests under the Royalty Agreement for a price applicable in a change of control.

During the term of the Royalty Agreement, the Company is entitled to designate an individual to be a member of AxoGen's board of directors. The Company has exercised this right and on October 5, 2012, upon close of the transaction, the Company's President and Chief Executive Officer was elected to AxoGen's board of directors.

On August 14, 2013, PDL purchased 1,166,666 shares of AXGN at $3.00 per share, totaling $3.5 million. The shares are classified as available-for-sale and recorded as short term investments on the consolidated balance sheet. As of December 31, 2013, the shares were valued at $5.2 million, which results in an unrealized gain of $1.7 million and is recorded in other comprehensive income (loss).

Avinger Note Receivable and Royalty Agreement

On April 18, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Avinger, under which we made available to Avinger up to $40.0 million to be used by Avinger in connection with the commercialization of its currently marketed lumivascular catheter devices and in the development of Avinger's lumivascular atherectomy device. Of the $40.0 million available to Avinger, we funded an initial $20.0 million, net of fees, at close of the transaction. Upon the attainment by Avinger of a certain revenue milestone to be accomplished no later than the end of the first half of 2014, we will fund them an additional amount between $10.0 million and $20.0 million (net of fees) at Avinger's election. Outstanding borrowings under the initial loan bear interest at a stated rate of 12% per annum, and any future outstanding borrowings as a result of an additional amount funded upon reaching the revenue milestone will bear interest at the rate of 14% per annum.

Avinger is required to make quarterly interest and principal payments. Principal repayment will commence on: (i) the eleventh interest payment date if the revenue milestone is not achieved or (ii) the thirteenth interest payment date if the revenue milestone is achieved. The principal amount outstanding at commencement of repayment, after taking into account any payment-in-kind, will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature in April 2018.

In connection with entering into the credit agreement, the Company will receive a low, single-digit royalty on Avinger's net revenues through April 2018. Avinger may prepay the outstanding principal and accrued interest on the notes receivable at any time. If Avinger repays the notes receivable prior to April 2018, the royalty on Avinger's net revenues will be reduced by 50% and will be subject to certain minimum payments from the prepayment date through April 2018.

The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Avinger and any of its subsidiaries (other than controlled foreign corporations, if any). The credit agreement provides for a number of standard events of default, including payment, bankruptcy, covenant, representation and warranty and judgment defaults.

LENSAR Credit Agreement

On October 1, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with LENSAR, under which PDL made available to LENSAR up to $60 million to be used by LENSAR in connection with the commercialization of its currently marketed LENSAR Laser System. Of the $60 million available to LENSAR, an initial $40 million, net of fees, was funded by PDL at close of the transaction. Upon the attainment by LENSAR of a specified sales milestone to be accomplished no later than September 30, 2014, PDL will fund LENSAR an additional $20 million. Outstanding borrowings under the loans bear interest at the rate of 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears.

Principal repayment will commence on the thirteenth interest payment date or December 30, 2016. The principal amount outstanding at the commencement of repayment will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature on October 1, 2018. LENSAR may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The loans are secured by all of the assets of LENSAR.

33




Durata Credit Agreement

On October 31, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Durata, whereby the Company made available to Durata up to $70.0 million . Of the $70.0 million available to Durata, an initial $25.0 million (tranche one), net of fees, was funded by the Company at the close of the transaction. Upon marketing approval of dalbavancin in the United States, to be accomplished no later than December 31, 2014 (the tranche two milestone), the Company will fund Durata an additional $15 million (tranche two). Within 9 months after the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, Durata may request up to a single additional $30 million borrowing. Until the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, outstanding borrowings under tranche one bear interest at the rate of 14.0% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears. Upon occurrence of the tranche two milestone, the interest rate of the loans will decrease to 12.75%.

Principal repayment will commence on the fifth interest payment date, March 31, 2015. The principal amount outstanding will be repaid quarterly over the remainder of the loans in an increasing percentage of the principal outstanding at commencement of repayment. The loans will mature on October 31, 2018. Durata may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The Company is entitled to receive a fee in addition to the prepayment penalty in the event that Durata undergoes a change in control. The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Durata.

Direct Flow Medical Credit Agreement

On November 5, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Direct Flow Medical, in which PDL will provide up to $50.0 million to Direct Flow Medical. Of the $50.0 million available to Direct Flow Medical, an initial $35.0 million (tranche one), net of fees, was provided by the Company at the close of the transaction. Upon the attainment of a specified revenue milestone to be accomplished no later than December 31, 2014 (the tranche two milestone), the Company will loan to Direct Flow Medical an additional $15.0 million, net of fees. Until the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, outstanding borrowings under tranche one bear interest at the rate of 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears. Upon occurrence of the tranche two milestone, the interest rate of the loans will decrease to 13.5%.

Principal repayment will commence on the twelfth interest payment date, September 30, 2016. The principal amount outstanding at commencement of repayment will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature on November 5, 2018. Direct Flow Medical may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Direct Flow Medical and any of its subsidiaries.

Paradigm Spine

On February 14, 2014, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Paradigm Spine, LLC, under which PDL made available to Paradigm up to $75 million to be used by Paradigm to refinance its existing credit facility and expand its domestic commercial operations. A portion of the amount available under the agreement in an aggregate principal amount equal to $50 million, net of fees, was funded at the close of the transaction. In the event that certain specified sales and other milestones occur before December 31, 2014, PDL will fund Paradigm between an additional $6.25 million and $12.5 million, at Paradigm’s discretion. In the event that additional specified sales and other milestones occur before June 30, 2015, PDL will fund up to an additional $12.5 million also at Paradigm’s discretion. Borrowings under the credit agreement bear interest at the rate of 13.0% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears.

Principal repayment will commence on the eleventh interest payment date, September 30, 2016. The principal amount outstanding at commencement of repayment will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature on February 14, 2019, or, if Paradigm has achieved the first milestone and the additional loan amount is provided to Paradigm, the loans will mature on August 14, 2019. Paradigm may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Paradigm and its domestic subsidiaries and, initially, certain assets of Paradigm’s German subsidiaries.

34




Intangible Assets

Depomed Royalty Purchase and Sales Agreement

On October 18, 2013, PDL entered into a royalty purchase and sale agreement with Depomed, Inc. and Depo DR Sub, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Depomed, whereby the Company acquired the rights to receive royalties and milestones payables on sales of Type 2 diabetes products licensed by Depomed in exchange for a $240.5 million cash payment. The transaction closed simultaneously with the execution of the royalty agreement.

Under the terms of the royalty agreement, the Company will receive all royalty and milestone payments due under license agreements between Depomed and its licensees until the Company has received payments equal to two times the cash payment made to Depomed, after which all net payments received will be shared evenly between the Company and Depomed.

The royalty agreement terminates on the third anniversary following the date upon which the later of the following occurs: (a) October 25, 2021, or (b) at such time as no royalty payments remain payable under any license agreement and each of the license agreements has expired by its terms.

Convertible Notes

Series 2012 Notes

We have actively worked to restructure the Company’s capital and reduce the potential dilution associated with our convertible notes. As part of those efforts, in January 2012, we exchanged and subsequently retired $169.0 million aggregate principal amount of our February 2015 Notes for an identical principal amount of our new Series 2012 Notes, plus a cash payment of $5.00 for each $1,000 principal amount tendered for a total cash incentive payment of approximately $0.8 million. In February 2012, we entered into separate privately negotiated exchange agreements under which we exchanged and subsequently retired an additional $10.0 million aggregate principal amount of our February 2015 Notes for $10.0 million aggregate principal amount of our Series 2012 Notes. In August 2013, the Company entered into a separate privately negotiated exchange agreement under which it retired the final $1.0 million aggregate principal amount of the Company's outstanding February 2015 Notes. Pursuant to the exchange agreement, the holder of the February 2015 Notes received $1.0 million aggregate principal amount of the Company's Series 2012 Notes. Immediately following the exchange, no principal amount of the February 2015 Notes remained outstanding and $180.0 million principal amount of the Series 2012 Notes is outstanding.

Our Series 2012 Notes net share settle, meaning that if a conversion occurs, the principal amount is due in cash, and to the extent that the conversion value exceeds the principal amount, the difference is due in shares of our common stock. The effect of issuing $179.0 million aggregate principal of our Series 2012 Notes with the net share settle feature in exchange for our February 2015 Notes was the reduction of 27.8 million shares of potential dilution to our stockholders at the time of the exchange.

On February 5 and 6, 2014, the Company entered into separate, privately negotiated exchange and purchase agreements under which it retired $131.7 million in aggregate principal of the Company’s outstanding Series 2012 Notes. The exchange agreements provided for the issuance, by the Company, of shares of common stock and a cash payment for the Series 2012 Notes being exchanged, and the purchase agreement provided for a cash payment for the Series 2012 Notes being repurchased. The Company issued a total of 20.3 million shares of its common stock and paid an aggregate cash payment of $34.2 million pursuant to the exchange and repurchase agreements.

May 2015 Notes

On May 16, 2011, we issued $155.3 million in aggregate principal amount, at par, of our May 2015 Notes in an underwritten public offering, for net proceeds of $149.7 million. Our May 2015 Notes are due May 1, 2015, and we pay interest at 3.75% on our May 2015 Notes semiannually in arrears on May 1 and November 1 of each year, beginning November 1, 2011. Proceeds from our May 2015 Notes, net of amounts used for purchased call option transactions and provided by the warrant transactions described below, were used to redeem our 2012 Notes. Upon the occurrence of a fundamental change, as defined in the indenture, holders have the option to require PDL to repurchase their May 2015 Notes at a purchase price equal to 100% of the principal, plus accrued interest.


35



February 2018 Notes

On February 6, 2014, the Company agreed to sell $260.87 million aggregate principal amount of its 4.00% Convertible Senior Notes due February 1, 2018, in an underwritten public offering. The conversion rate of the February 2018 Notes will initially be 109.1048 shares of common stock per $1,000 principal amount of the February 2018 Notes equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $9.17 per share of common stock. The conversion rate, subject to increase under certain circumstances, will not be increased in respect of regular quarterly cash dividends paid by us that do not exceed $0.15 per share.

On February 12, 2014, the Company issued $300 million aggregate principal amount of February 2018 Notes, which included $39.13 million aggregate principal amount of February 2018 Notes issued pursuant to the exercise of the underwriters’ overallotment option to purchase additional 2018 Notes. In connection with the offering of the February 2018 Notes, PDL entered into privately negotiated convertible note hedge transactions with affiliates of RBC Capital Markets and Well Fargo Securities (“hedge counterparties”) and privately negotiated warrant transactions with the hedge counterparties relating to the same number of shares of PDL’s common stock.

Effect of December 12, 2013, Dividend Payment on Conversion Rates for the Convertible Notes
 
In connection with the December 12, 2013, dividend payment, the conversion rates for our convertible notes adjusted as follows:

Convertible Notes
 
Conversion Rate
per $1,000
Principal Amount
 
Approximate
Conversion Price Per Common Share
 
Effective Date
Series 2012 Notes
 
182.598

 
$
5.48

 
December 3, 2013
May 2015 Notes
 
159.9165

 
$
6.25

 
December 3, 2013

The adjustments were based on the amount of the dividend and the trading price of our stock under the terms of the applicable indenture.

Term Loan

On October 28, 2013, PDL entered into the Term loan for $75 million, with a term of one year.

The interest rates per annum applicable to amounts outstanding under the Term Loan are, at the Company’s option, either (a) the base rate plus 1.00%, or (b) the Eurodollar rate plus 2.00% per annum. As of December 31, 2013, the interest rate was 2.24%. Interest and principal payments associated with the Term Loan are due on the interest payment dates of January 31, April 30, and July 31 of 2014, with the remaining outstanding balance due on October 28, 2014.

Any future material domestic subsidiaries of the Company are required to guarantee the obligations of the Company under the Term Loan, except as otherwise provided. The Company’s obligations under the Term Loan are secured by a lien on a substantial portion of its assets.

The Term Loan contains affirmative and negative covenants that the Company believes are usual and customary for a senior secured credit agreement. The Term loan also requires compliance with certain financial covenants, including a maximum total leverage ratio and a debt service coverage ratio, in each case calculated as set forth in the Term Loan and compliance with which may be necessary to take certain corporate actions.

The Term Loan contains events of default that the Company believes are usual and customary for a senior secured credit agreement


36



2014 Dividends
 
On January 29, 2014 , our board of directors declared regular quarterly dividends of $0.15 per share of common stock, payable on March 12, June 12, September 12 and December 12 of 2014 to stockholders of record on March 5, June 5, September 5 and December 5 of 2014 , the record dates for each of the dividend payments, respectively. At the beginning of each fiscal year, our board of directors sets the Company’s total annual dividend payment for the year. The board of directors evaluates the financial condition of the Company and considers the economic outlook, corporate cash flow, the Company’s liquidity needs and the health and stability of credit markets when determining the dividend.
 
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
 
The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with GAAP and the Company's discussion and analysis of its financial condition and operating results require the Company's management to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported in its consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K describes the significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of the Company's consolidated financial statements. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities. Actual results may differ from these estimates and such differences may be material.

Management believes the Company's critical accounting policies and estimates are those related to royalty revenues, foreign currency hedging, income taxes, notes receivable, convertible notes, and lease guarantee. Management considers these policies critical because they are both important to the portrayal of the Company's financial condition and operating results, and they require management to make judgments and estimates about inherently uncertain matters.
 
Royalty Revenues

Patent License Agreements

Under most of our patent license agreements, we receive royalty payments based upon our licensees’ net sales of covered products. Generally, under these agreements we receive royalty reports and payments from our licensees approximately one quarter in arrears, generally in the second month of the quarter after the licensee has sold the income generating product or products. We recognize royalty revenues when we can reliably estimate such amounts and collectability is reasonably assured. As such, we generally recognize royalty revenues in the quarter reported to us by our licensees. Therefore, royalty revenues are generally recognized one quarter following the quarter in which sales by our licensees occurred. Under this accounting policy, the royalty revenues we report are not based upon our estimates and are typically reported in the same period in which we receive payment from our licensees.
 
We may also receive annual license maintenance fees from licensees of our Queen et al. patents prior to patent expiry as well as periodic milestone payments, payable at the election of the licensee, to maintain the license in effect. We have no performance obligations with respect to such fees. Maintenance fees are recognized as they are due and when payment is reasonably assured. Total milestone payments in each of the last several years have been less than 1% of total revenue.

Acquired Royalty Revenues

We receive royalty payments based upon net sales of Depomed's covered products. Generally, under these agreements we receive royalty reports and payments from Depomed approximately one month in arrears. We recognize royalty revenues when we can reliably estimate such amounts and collectability is reasonably assured. As such, we generally recognize royalty revenues in the month reported to us by Depomed. Therefore, royalty revenues are generally recognized one month following the month in which covered product sales occurred. Under this accounting policy, the royalty revenues we report are not based upon our estimates and are typically reported in the same period in which we receive payment from our licensees.
  

37



Foreign Currency Hedging
 
We hedge certain Euro-denominated currency exposures related to our licensees’ product sales with Euro forward contracts. In general, these contracts are intended to offset the underlying Euro market risks in our royalty revenues. We do not enter into speculative foreign currency transactions. We designate foreign currency exchange contracts used to hedge royalty revenues based on underlying Euro-denominated sales as cash flow hedges.

At the inception of the hedging relationship and on a quarterly basis, we assess hedge effectiveness. The fair value of the Euro forward contracts is estimated using pricing models with readily observable inputs from actively quoted markets and is disclosed on a gross basis. The aggregate unrealized gain or loss, net of tax, on the effective portion of the hedge is recorded in stockholders’ equity (deficit) as accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). Gains or losses on cash flow hedges are recognized as an adjustment to royalty revenue in the same period that the hedged transaction impacts earnings. The hedge effectiveness is dependent upon the amounts of future royalties and, if future royalties based on Euro are lower than forecasted, the amount of ineffectiveness would be reported in our Consolidated Statements of Income.
 
Income Taxes
 
Our income tax provision is based on income before taxes and is computed using the liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the financial statement and tax basis of assets and liabilities using tax rates projected to be in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. We record a valuation allowance to reduce our deferred tax assets to the amounts that are more likely than not to be realized. Significant estimates are required in determining our provision for income taxes. Some of these estimates are based on interpretations of existing tax laws or regulations, or the expected results from any future tax examinations. Various internal and external factors may have favorable or unfavorable effects on our future provision for income taxes. These factors include, but are not limited to, changes in tax laws, regulations and/or rates, the results of any future tax examinations, changing interpretations of existing tax laws or regulations, changes in estimates of prior years’ items, past levels of research and development spending, acquisitions, changes in our corporate structure and state of domicile and changes in overall levels of income before taxes all of which may result in periodic revisions to our provision for income taxes. We accrue tax related interest and penalties associated with uncertain tax positions and include these in income tax expense in the Consolidated Statements of Income. We expect that our effective income tax rate going forward will be approximately 35%.

We apply the provision of ASC 740, which contains a two-step approach to recognizing and measuring uncertain tax positions. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of related appeals or litigation processes, if any. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely of being realized upon settlement.

Although we believe we have adequately accrued for our uncertain tax positions, no assurance can be given that the final tax outcome of these matters will not be different. We adjust these accruals in light of changing facts and circumstances, such as the closing of a tax audit. To the extent that the final tax outcome of these matters is different than the amounts recorded, such differences will impact the provision for income taxes in the period in which such determination is made. The provision for income taxes includes the impact of uncertain tax positions accrual changes to reserves that are considered appropriate, as well as the related net interest settlement of any particular position, could require the use of cash. In addition, we are subject to the continuous examination of our income tax returns by various taxing authorities, including the Internal Revenue Service and U.S. states. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes.

Notes and Other Long-Term Receivables

Notes receivable and loans originated by us are initially recorded at the amount advanced to the borrower. Notes receivable and loan origination and commitment fees, net of certain origination costs, are recorded as an adjustment to the carrying value of the notes receivable and loans and are amortized over the term of the related financial asset under the effective interest method.  Certain of our notes receivable and loans require the borrower to make variable payments which are dependent upon the borrower's sales of specific products. We have elected to use the prospective interest method to account for these notes receivable and loans subsequent to their initial recognition. Under this approach, we recognize the impact of any variations from the expected returns in the period when received. From time to time, we will re-evaluate the expected cash flows and may adjust the effective interest rate prospective from the date of assessment, if the impact of such adjustment could be material to our financial statements.

38




We evaluate the collectability of both interest and principal for each note and loan to determine whether it is impaired. A note or loan is considered to be impaired when, based on current information and events, we determine it is probable that we will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the existing contractual terms. When a note or loan is considered to be impaired, the amount of loss is calculated by comparing the carrying value of the financial asset to the value determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at the loan's effective interest rate. If the loan is collateralized and we expect repayment to be provided solely by the collateral, then the amount of loss is calculated by comparing the carrying value of the financial asset to the estimated fair value of the underlying collateral, less expense to sell.

Convertible Notes

In 2014, we issued our February 2018 Notes with a net share settlement feature, meaning that upon any conversion, the principal amount will be settled in cash and the remaining amount, if any, will be settled in shares of our common stock. In accordance with accounting guidance for convertible debt instruments that may be settled in cash or other assets on conversion, we will separate the principal balance between the fair value of the liability component and the common stock conversion feature using a market interest rate for a similar nonconvertible instrument at the date of issuance.

In 2012, we issued our Series 2012 Notes with a net share settlement feature. In accordance with accounting guidance for convertible debt instruments that may be settled in cash or other assets on conversion, we separated the principal balance between the fair value of the liability component and the common stock conversion feature using a market interest rate for a similar nonconvertible instrument at the date of issuance. Using an assumed borrowing rate of 7.3%, an estimated market interest rate for a similar convertible instrument available to us on the date of issuance, we recorded a total debt discount of $16.8 million, allocated $10.9 million to additional paid-in capital and $5.9 million to deferred tax liability.

In 2011, we issued our May 2015 Notes with a net share settlement feature. In accordance with accounting guidance for convertible debt instruments that may be settled in cash or other assets on conversion, we separated the principal balance between the fair value of the liability component and the common stock conversion feature using a market interest rate for a similar nonconvertible instrument at the date of issuance. Using an assumed borrowing rate of 7.5%, an estimated market interest rate for a similar convertible instrument available to us on the date of issuance, we recorded a total debt discount of $18.9 million, allocated $12.3 million to additional paid-in capital and $6.6 million to deferred tax liability.

Lease Guarantee
 
In connection with the Spin-Off, we entered into amendments to the leases for our former facilities in Redwood City, California, under which Facet was added as a co-tenant under the leases, and a Co-Tenancy Agreement, under which Facet agreed to indemnify us for all matters related to the leases attributable to the period after the Spin-Off date. Should Facet default under its lease obligations, we could be held liable by the landlord as a co-tenant and, thus, we have in substance guaranteed the payments under the lease agreements for the Redwood City facilities. As of December 31, 2013 , the total lease payments for the duration of the guarantee, which runs through December 2021, are approximately $90.2 million . In April 2010, Abbot Laboratories acquired Facet and later renamed the entity AbbVie Biotherapeutics, Inc. If AbbVie were to default, we could also be responsible for lease related costs including utilities, property taxes and common area maintenance which may be as much as the actual lease payments.
 
We recorded a liability of $10.7 million on our Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2013 and 2012 , for the estimated liability resulting from this guarantee. We prepared a discounted, probability-weighted cash flow analysis to calculate the estimated fair value of the lease guarantee as of the Spin-Off. We were required to make assumptions regarding the probability of Facet’s default on the lease payment, the likelihood of a sublease being executed and the times at which these events could occur. These assumptions are based on information that we received from real estate brokers and the then-current economic conditions, as well as expectations of future economic conditions. The fair value of this lease guarantee was charged to additional paid-in capital upon the Spin-Off and any future adjustments to the carrying value of the obligation will also be recorded in additional paid-in capital. In future periods, we may increase the recorded liability for this obligation if we conclude that a loss, which is larger than the amount recorded, is both probable and estimable.

Summary of 2013 , 2012 and 2011 Financial Results

Our net income for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 was $264.5 million , $211.7 million and $199.4 million , respectively;


39



At December 31, 2013 , we had cash, cash equivalents, investments and restricted investments of $99.5 million as compared with $168.7 million at December 31, 2012 ; and

At December 31, 2013 , we had $430.5 million in total liabilities as compared with $348.1 million at December 31, 2012 .

Revenues
 
Revenues were $442.9 million , $374.5 million and $362.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , respectively, and consist of royalty revenues as well as in 2013 and 2011 other license related revenues. During the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , our royalty revenues consisted of royalties and maintenance fees earned on sales of products under license agreements associated with our Queen et al. patents, and during the year ended December 31, 2013 , royalty revenues also included $11.2 million in royalties associated with the first two months of recorded royalties from U.S. sales of Glumetza from our Depomed royalty purchase agreement. Over this same time period, our other license related revenues primarily consisted of milestone payments from licensees under our patent license agreements as well as a $10.0 million payment in 2011 from our legal settlement with UCB. Our revenues consist primarily of royalty revenues, which represent more than 95% of total revenues for each of the past three years. Revenues for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , are net of the payments made under our February 2011 settlement agreement with Novartis, which is based on a portion of the royalties that the company receives from Lucentis sales made by Novartis outside the United States.

A summary of our revenues for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , is presented below:

(Dollars in thousands)
 
2013
 
2012
 
Change from Prior Year %
 
2011
 
Change from Prior Year %
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Royalties
 
$
441,421

 
$
374,525

 
18
%
 
$
351,641

 
7
%
License and other
 
1,500

 

 
N/M

 
10,400

 
N/M

Total revenues
 
$
442,921

 
$
374,525

 
18
%
 
$
362,041

 
3
%
____________________________
N/M = Not meaningful

In the year ended December 31, 2013 , we received on Queen et al. patent royalties on sales of the eight humanized antibody products listed below, all of which are currently approved for use by the FDA and other regulatory agencies outside the United States. The licensees with commercial products as of December 31, 2013 , are listed below:

Licensee
 
Product Names
Genentech
 
Avastin
 
 
Herceptin
 
 
Xolair
 
 
Lucentis
 
 
Perjeta
 
 
Kadcyla
 
 
 
Biogen Idec 1
 
Tysabri
 
 
 
Chugai
 
Actemra
___________________
1 In April 2013, Biogen Idec completed its purchase of Elan's interest in Tysabri. Prior to this our licensee for Tysabri was identified as Elan.

Under our agreements for the license of rights under our Queen et al. patents, we received a flat-rate or tiered royalty based upon our licensees’ net sales of covered products. Royalty payments are generally due one quarter in arrears, that is, generally in the second month of the quarter after the licensee has sold the royalty-bearing product. Until the August 15, 2013, effective date of

40



the Settlement Agreement, our agreement with Genentech provided for a tiered royalty structure under which the royalty rates Genentech must pay on the U.S.-based Sales in a given calendar year decreased on incremental U.S.-based Sales above certain sales thresholds based on 95% of the underlying gross U.S.-based Sales. As a result of the tiered royalty structure, Genentech’s average annual royalty rate for a given year declined as Genentech’s U.S.-based Sales increased during that year. Because we received royalties in arrears, the average royalty rate for the payments we received from Genentech in our second calendar quarter for Genentech’s sales from the first calendar quarter. The average royalty rate for payments we received from Genentech are generally lowest in our fourth and first calendar quarters for Genentech’s sales from the third and fourth calendar quarters when more of Genentech’s U.S.-based Sales bore royalties at the 1% royalty rate. In 2013, the blended rate for the full year of royalties from Genentech products was a approximately 1.9%.

The net sales thresholds and the applicable royalty rates for Genentech’s U.S.-based Sales recognized by us prior to the Settlement Agreement are outlined below:

Genentech Products Made or Sold in the U.S.
 
Royalty Rate
Net sales up to $1.5 billion
 
3.0%
Net sales between $1.5 billion and up to $2.5 billion
 
2.5%
Net sales between $2.5 billion and up to $4.0 billion
 
2.0%
Net sales exceeding $4.0 billion
 
1.0%

With respect to the ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales, prior to August 15, 2013, the royalty rate that we received from Genentech was a fixed rate of 3% based on 95% of the underlying gross ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales. The mix of U.S.-based Sales and ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales has fluctuated in the past and may continue to fluctuate in future periods. The mix of net ex-U.S.-based Sales and net ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales for the Genentech Products, as outlined below, is based on information provided to us by Genentech. We were not provided the reasons for the fluctuations in the manufacturing split between U.S.-based Sales and ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales.

 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Avastin
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
58
%
 
56
%
 
55
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
43
%
 
29
%
 
21
%
Herceptin
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
68
%
 
69
%
 
71
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
40
%
 
37
%
 
35
%
Kadcyla
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
2
%
 
0
%
 
0
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
0
%
 
0
%
 
0
%
Lucentis
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
64
%
 
63
%
 
59
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
0
%
 
0
%
 
0
%
Perjeta
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
24
%
 
1
%
 
0
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
0
%
 
0
%
 
0
%
Xolair
 
 
 
 
 
Ex-U.S.-based sales
40
%
 
39
%
 
40
%
Ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales
40
%
 
39
%
 
40
%

For the year ended December 31, 2013 , compared to December 31, 2012
 
Royalty revenues increased 18% for the year ended December 31, 2013 , when compared to the same period in 2012 . The growth is primarily driven by increased net sales of Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, Xolair and Actemra by our licensees, along with the

41



addition of the royalty payments from the Company's purchase of Depomed's diabetes-related royalties. Net sales of Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis and Xolair are subject to a tiered royalty rate for product that is U.S.-based Sales and a flat royalty rate of 3% for product that is ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales.

Reported net sales of Avastin increased $0.6 billion or 10% compared to the same period for the prior year.

Reported net sales of Herceptin increased $0.4 billion or 6% compared to the same period for the prior year.

Reported Lucentis sales increased $0.4 billion or 10% compared to the same period for the prior year.

Reported Xolair sales increased $0.2 billion or 14% compared to the same period for the prior year.

For the year ended December 31, 2012 , compared to December 31, 2011

Royalty revenues increased 7% for the year ended December 31, 2012 , when compared to the same period in 2011 . The growth is primarily driven by increased net sales of Lucentis, Herceptin, Xolair and Tysabri by our licensees. Net sales of Avastin, Herceptin, Lucentis, and Xolair were subject to a tiered royalty rate for product that is U.S.-based Sales and a flat royalty rate of 3% for product that is ex-U.S.-based Manufacturing and Sales.

Reported net sales of Herceptin increased $0.4 billion or 7% compared to the same period for the prior year.

Reported Lucentis sales increased $0.4 billion or 11% compared to the same period for the prior year.

Reported sales of Tysabri increased $0.1 billion or 8% compared to the same period for the prior year. Tysabri royalties are determined at a flat rate as a percent of the sales regardless of location of manufacture or sale.

Reported net sales of Avastin increased $0.1 billion or 1% compared to the same period for the prior year.

The following table summarizes the percentage of our total revenues earned from our licensees’ net product sales, which individually accounted for 10% or more of our total revenues for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 :

 
 
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
Licensee
 
Product Name
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Genentech
 
Avastin
 
33
%
 
32
%
 
31
%
 
 
Herceptin
 
32
%
 
34
%
 
33
%
 
 
Lucentis
 
10
%
 
12
%
 
15
%
Elan
 
Tysabri
 
11
%
 
13
%
 
12
%

Foreign currency exchange rates also impact our reported revenues. More than 50% of our licensees’ product sales are in currencies other than U.S. dollars; as such, our revenues may fluctuate due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates and are subject to foreign currency exchange risk. While foreign currency conversion terms vary by license agreement, generally most agreements require that royalties first be calculated in the currency of sale and then converted into U.S. dollars using the average daily exchange rates for that currency for a specified period at the end of the calendar quarter. Accordingly, when the U.S. dollar weakens against other currencies, the converted amount is greater than it would have been had the U.S. dollar not weakened. For example, in a quarter in which we generate $70 million in royalty revenues, and when approximately $35 million is based on sales in currencies other than U.S. dollar, if the U.S. dollar strengthens across all currencies by ten percent during the conversion period for that quarter, when compared to the same amount of local currency royalties for the prior year, U.S. dollar converted royalties will be approximately $3.5 million less in the current quarter than in the prior year quarter. The impact on full year revenue is greatest in the second quarter when we receive the largest amount of royalties because the Genentech tiered royalties are at their highest rate for first quarter sales.
 
For the year ended December 31, 2013 , we hedged certain Euro-denominated currency exposures related to our licensees’ product sales with Euro forward contracts. We designate foreign currency exchange contracts used to hedge royalty revenues based on underlying Euro-denominated sales as cash flow hedges. The aggregate unrealized gain or loss, net of tax, on the effective portion of the hedge is recorded in stockholders’ equity (deficit) as accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). Gains or losses on cash flow hedges are recognized as an adjustment to royalty revenue in the same period that the hedged transaction impacts

42



earnings. For the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , we recognized ($2.3) million , ($2.9) million and $1.0 million in royalty revenues from our Euro contracts, respectively.
 
Operating Expenses
 
A summary of our operating expenses for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , is presented below:

 (Dollars in thousands, except for percentages)
 
2013
 
2012
 
 Change from Prior Year %
 
2011
 
 Change from Prior Year %
Cost of royalty revenues (amortization of intangible asset)
 
$
5,637

 
$

 
N/M

 
$

 
N/M

Percentage of total revenues
 
1
%
 
0
%
 
 
 
0
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 General and administrative
 
$
29,755

 
$
25,469

 
17
%
 
$
18,338

 
39
%
 Percentage of total revenues
 
7
%
 
7
%
 
 
 
5
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total operating expenses
 
$
35,392

 
$
25,469

 
39
%
 
$
18,338

 
39
%
 Percentage of total revenues
 
8
%
 
7
%
 
 
 
5
%
 
 
____________________
N/M = Not meaningful

For the year ended December 31, 2013 , compared to December 31, 2012

The increase in operating expenses was a result of the additional of cost of royalty revenues of $5.6 million in the fourth quarter of 2013 related to two months of amortization of the intangible assets acquired as part of the Royalty Purchase Agreement with Depomed, an increase in general and administrative expenses related to professional services of $2.4 million mostly related to our efforts to acquire income generating assets, a $1.1 million increase in legal expenses mostly related to litigation and a $1.0 million increase in compensation related expenses.

For the year ended December 31, 2012 , compared to December 31, 2011
 
The increase in operating expenses was a result of increased legal expenses of $3.7 million mostly related to litigation, a $1.4 million increase in professional services related to our efforts to acquire income generating assets and a $1.4 million increase in compensation related expenses.

Non-operating Expense, Net
 
A summary of our non-operating expense, net, for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , is presented below:

(Dollars in thousands)
 
2013
 
2012
 
Change from Prior Year %
 
2011
 
Change from Prior Year %
Loss on retirement or conversion of convertible notes
 
$

 
$

 
N/M

 
$
(766
)
 
N/M

Interest and other income, net
 
19,218

 
7,113

 
170
 %
 
593

 
1,099
 %
Interest expense
 
(24,871
)
 
(29,036
)
 
(14
)%
 
(36,102
)
 
(20
)%
Total non-operating expense, net
 
$
(5,653
)
 
$
(21,923
)
 
(74
)%
 
$
(36,275
)
 
(40
)%
____________________
N/M = Not meaningful

For the year ended December 31, 2013 , compared to December 31, 2012

Non-operating expense, net, decreased primarily due to lower interest expense as a result of our Non-recourse Notes being fully repaid during 2012 and increased interest income from our notes receivable, offset, in part, by increased interest expense on our Series 2012 Notes and May 2015 Notes. The approximate $12.1 million increase in interest income to $19.2 million is a result of the increase in loans to late stage healthcare companies as part of our strategy to acquire income generating assets. The increase in

43



interest expense consisted primarily of non-cash interest expense as we were required to compute interest expense using the interest rate for similar nonconvertible instruments in accordance with the accounting guidance for convertible debt instruments that may be settled in cash or other assets on conversion. Non-cash interest expense, in accordance with the accounting guidance, for the Series 2012 Notes, May 2015 Notes and our term loan was $11.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 , and for the Series 2012 and May 2015 Notes was $10.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012.

For the year ended December 31, 2012 , compared to December 31, 2011
 
Non-operating expense, net, decreased primarily due to lower interest expense as a result of our quarterly repayment of the principal balance of our Non-recourse Notes and increased interest income from our Notes Receivable, offset, in part, by increased interest expense on our Series 2012 Notes and our May 2015 Notes. The increase in interest expense consisted primarily of non-cash interest expense as we were required to compute interest expense using the interest rate for similar nonconvertible instruments in accordance with the accounting guidance for convertible debt instruments that may be settled in cash or other assets on conversion. Non-cash interest expense, in accordance with the accounting guidance, for the Series 2012 Notes and May 2015 Notes was $10.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 , and for the May 2015 Notes, February 2015 Notes and 2012 Notes was $3.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.

Income Taxes
 
Income tax expense for the year ended December 31, 2013 , was $137.3 million , which resulted primarily from applying the federal statutory income tax rate to income before income taxes. Income tax expense for the year ended December 31, 2012 , was $115.5 million , which resulted primarily from applying the federal statutory income tax rate to income before income taxes. Income tax expense for the year ended December 31, 2011 , was $108.0 million , which resulted primarily from applying the federal statutory income tax rate to income before income taxes and adjusting for a portion of the loss on the retirement or conversion of our 2023 Notes that was not tax deductible.
 
During the year ended December 31, 2013 , as a result of the evaluation of our uncertain tax positions, we increased the unrecognized tax benefits by $5.5 million primarily related to state items and decreased the unrecognized tax benefits by $5.7 million due to expiration of statute of limitations for our tax attributes. The Company expects its unrecognized tax benefits to decrease by $6.5 million due to the expiration of statute of limitations within the next twelve months, of which $6.5 million would affect the effective tax rate. During the year ended December 31, 2012 , we recorded no change in our liability associated with uncertain tax positions. The future impact of the unrecognized tax benefits of $32.4 million , if recognized, comprises $9.3 million which would affect the effective tax rate and $23.1 million which would result in adjustments to deferred tax assets and corresponding adjustments to the valuation allowance.
 
Estimated interest and penalties associated with unrecognized tax benefits increased our income tax expense in the Consolidated Statements of Income by $0.7 million during the year ended December 31, 2013, increased income tax expense by $0.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2012 , and increased income tax expense by $0.5 million during the year ended December 31, 2011 . Although the timing of the resolution of income tax examinations is highly uncertain, and the amounts ultimately paid, if any, upon resolution of the issues raised by the taxing authorities may differ materially from the amounts accrued for each year, except as noted above, we do not anticipate any material change to the amount of our unrecognized tax benefit over the next twelve months.
 
As of December 31, 2013 , we had net deferred tax assets in excess of our deferred tax liabilities of approximately $7.1 million . We recorded a valuation allowance to reduce our deferred tax assets to amounts that are more likely than not to be realized. As of December 31, 2013 , we had a valuation allowance of $5.4 million , primarily related to net operating loss carry forwards and research and development tax credits.

Net Income per Share
 
Net income per share for the years ended December 31, 2013 , 2012 and 2011 , is presented below:

 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Net income per basic share
$
1.89

 
$
1.52

 
$
1.43

Net income per diluted share
$
1.66

 
$
1.45

 
$
1.15



44



Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
We finance our operations primarily through royalty and other license-related revenues, public and private placements of debt and equity securities and interest income on invested capital. We currently have fewer than ten full-time employees managing our intellectual property, our asset acquisitions and other corporate activities as well as providing for certain essential reporting and management functions of a public company.
 
We had cash, cash equivalents and investments in the aggregate of $99.5 million and $148.7 million , excluding restricted investments, at December 31, 2013 and 2012 , respectively. The decrease was primarily attributable to the purchase of the Depomed intangible asset of $241.3 million , cash advanced on notes receivable of $148.7 million , payment of dividends of $84.0 million , offset in part by net cash provided by operating activities of $270.9 million and repayment of notes receivable of $58.1 million . We believe that cash from future royalty revenues, net of operating expenses, debt service and income taxes, plus cash on hand, will be sufficient to fund our operations over the next several years. The last of our Queen et al. patents expires in December 2014, with the obligation to pay royalties under various license agreements expiring sometime thereafter, and we do not expect to receive any meaningful revenue from our Queen et al. patents beyond the first quarter of 2016.
 
We continuously evaluate alternatives to increase return for our stockholders by, for example, acquiring income generating assets, buying back our convertible notes, repurchasing our common stock, selling the Company and paying dividends. On January 29, 2014 , our board of directors declared regular quarterly dividends of $0.15 per share of common stock, payable on March 12, June 12, September 12 and December 12 of 2014 to stockholders of record on March 5, June 5, September 5 and December 5 of 2014 , the record dates for each of the dividend payments, respectively.

Notes and Other Long-term Receivables
 
Wellstat Diagnostics Note Receivable and Credit Agreement

In March 2012, the Company executed a $7.5 million two-year senior secured note receivable with the holders of the equity interests in Wellstat Diagnostics. In addition to bearing interest at 10% per annum, the note gave PDL certain rights to negotiate for certain future financing transactions. In August 2012, PDL and the borrowers amended the note receivable, providing a senior secured note receivable of $10.0 million, bearing interest at 12% per annum, to replace the original $7.5 million note. This $10.0 million note was repaid on November 2, 2012.

On November 2, 2012, the Company and Wellstat Diagnostics entered into a $40.0 million credit agreement pursuant to which the Company is to accrue quarterly interest payments at the rate of 5% per annum (payable in cash or in kind). In addition, PDL will receive quarterly royalty payments based on a low double digit royalty rate of Wellstat Diagnostics' net revenues, generated by the sale, distribution or other use of Wellstat Diagnostics' products, if any, commencing upon the commercialization of its products.

In January 2013, the Company was informed that, as of November 2012, Wellstat Diagnostics had used funds contrary to the terms of the credit agreement and breached Sections 2.1.2 and 7 of the credit agreement. PDL sent Wellstat Diagnostics a notice of default on January 22, 2013, and accelerated the amounts owed under the credit agreement. In connection with the notice of default, PDL exercised one of its available remedies and transferred approximately $8.1 million of available cash from a bank account of Wellstat Diagnostics to PDL and applied the funds to amounts due under the credit agreement. On February 28, 2013, the parties entered into a forbearance agreement whereby PDL agreed to refrain from exercising additional remedies for 120 days while Wellstat Diagnostics raised funds to capitalize the business and the parties attempted to negotiate a revised credit agreement. PDL agreed to provide up to $7.9 million to Wellstat Diagnostics to fund the business for the 120-day forbearance period under the terms of the forbearance agreement. Following the conclusion of the June 28 forbearance period, the Company agreed to forbear in its exercise of remedies for additional periods of time to allow the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics to complete a pending financing transaction. During such forbearance period, the Company provided approximately $1.3 million to Wellstat Diagnostics to fund ongoing operations of the business. During the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately $8.7 million was advanced pursuant to the forbearance agreement.

On August 15, 2013, the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics completed a financing transaction to fulfill its obligations under the forbearance agreement. On August 15, 2013, the Company entered into an amended and restated credit agreement with Wellstat Diagnostics. The Company determined that the new agreement should be accounted for as a modification of the existing agreement.

Except as otherwise described here, the material terms of the amended credit agreement are substantially the same as those of the original credit agreement, including quarterly interest payments at the rate of 5% per annum (payable in cash or in kind). In

45



addition, PDL to receive quarterly royalty payments based on a low double digit royalty rate of Wellstat Diagnostics' net revenues upon successful commercialization. However, pursuant to the amended credit agreement: (i) the principal amount was reset to approximately $44.1 million which was comprised of approximately $33.7 million original loan principal and interest, $1.3 million term loan principal and interest and $9.1 million forbearance principal and interest; (ii) the specified internal rates of return increased; (iii) the default interest rate was increased; (iv) Wellstat Diagnostics' obligation to provide certain financial information increased in frequency to monthly; (v) internal financial controls were strengthened by requiring Wellstat Diagnostics to maintain an independent, third-party financial professional with control over fund disbursements; (vi) the Company waived the existing events of default; and (vii) the owners and affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics are required to contribute additional capital to Wellstat Diagnostics upon the sale, if any, of an affiliated entity. The restated credit agreement continues to have an ultimate maturity date of December 31, 2021 (but may mature earlier upon certain specified events).

When the principal amount was reset it resulted in a $2.5 million reduction of the carrying value of the note receivable which was recorded as a financing cost as a component of interest and other income, net. The new carrying value is lower as a function of the variable nature of the internal rate of return to be realized by the Company based on when the note is repaid. The internal rate of return calculation, although increased, was reset when the credit agreement was amended and restated.

Wellstat Diagnostics may prepay the amended credit agreement at a price that, together with interest and royalty payments already made to the Company, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company. In the event of a change of control, bankruptcy or certain other customary events of defaults, or Wellstat Diagnostics' failure to achieve a specified annual revenue threshold in 2017, Wellstat Diagnostics will be required to prepay the amended credit agreement at a price that, together with interest and royalty payments already made to the Company, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company. The amended credit agreement is secured by a pledge of all of the assets of Wellstat Diagnostics, a pledge of all of Wellstat Diagnostics’ equity interests by the holders thereof, and a second lien on the assets of the affiliates of Wellstat Diagnostics.

At December 31, 2013 , and 2012 , the carrying value of the note was included in non-current assets.

As of December 31, 2013 , the Company determined that its interest in Wellstat Diagnostics represented a variable interest in a Variable Interest Entity since Wellstat Diagnostics' equity was not sufficient to finance its operations without amounts advanced to it under the Company's note and forbearance agreement. However, the Company does not have the power to direct the activities of Wellstat Diagnostics that most significantly impacts Wellstat Diagnostics's economic performance and is not the primary beneficiary of Wellstat Diagnostics; therefore, Wellstat Diagnostics is not subject to consolidation.

As of December 31, 2013 , the carrying value of all amounts advanced to Wellstat Diagnostics was $47.7 million, which was recorded in notes receivable. As of December 31, 2013 , the maximum loss exposure was $47.7 million.
 
Merus Labs Note Receivable and Credit Agreement

In July 2012, PDL loaned $35.0 million to Merus Labs in connection with its acquisition of a commercial-stage pharmaceutical product and related assets. In addition, PDL agreed to provide a $20.0 million letter of credit on behalf of Merus Labs for the seller of the assets to draw upon to satisfy the remaining $20.0 million purchase price obligation. The seller made this draw on the letter of credit in July 2013 and an additional loan to Merus Labs for $20.0 million was recorded for an aggregate of $55.0 million in total borrowings.

Outstanding borrowings under the July 2012 loan bore interest at the rate of 13.5% per annum and outstanding borrowings as a result of the draw on the letter of credit bore interest at the rate of 14.0% per annum. Merus Labs was required to make four periodic principal payments in respect of the July 2012 loan, with repayment of the remaining principal balance of all loans due on March 31, 2015. The borrowings were subject to mandatory prepayments upon certain asset dispositions or debt issuances as set forth in the credit agreement. Merus Labs made the first of these payments in December 2012 in the amount of $5.0 million, and made the second payment in June 2013 in the amount of $7.5 million. In September 2013, Merus Labs made two additional payments totaling $43.3 million, including the prepayment fee, in order to pay its remaining outstanding balance.

In September 2013, Merus Labs prepaid in full its obligations under the credit agreement , including accrued interest through the payment date and a prepayment fee of 1% of the aggregate principal amount outstanding at the time of repayment. There was no outstanding balance owed as of December 31, 2013 .


46



AxoGen Royalty Agreement

In October 2012, PDL entered into the Royalty Agreement with AxoGen pursuant to which the Company will receive specified royalties on AxoGen’s net revenues (as defined in the Royalty Agreement) generated by the sale, distribution or other use of AxoGen’s products (assigned interests). The Royalty Agreement has an eight year term and provides PDL with royalties of 9.95% based on AxoGen net revenues, subject to agreed-upon guaranteed quarterly minimum payments of approximately $1.3 to $2.5 million beginning in the fourth quarter of 2014, and the right to require AxoGen to repurchase the Royalty Agreement at the end of the fourth year. AxoGen has been granted certain rights to call the contract in years five through eight. The total consideration PDL paid to AxoGen for the assigned interests was $20.8 million, including the termination of an interim funding of $1.8 million in August 2012. AxoGen was required to use a portion of the proceeds from the Royalty Agreement to pay the outstanding balance under its existing credit facility with a third party. AxoGen plans to use the remainder of the proceeds to support the business plan for its products. The royalty rights are secured by the cash and accounts receivable of AxoGen.

Under the Royalty Agreement, beginning on October 1, 2016, or in the event of the occurrence of a material adverse event or AxoGen's bankruptcy or material breach of the Royalty Agreement, the Company may require AxoGen to repurchase the assigned interests at a price that, together with payments already made by AxoGen, would generate a specified internal rate of return to the Company. The Company has concluded that the repurchase option is an embedded derivative which should be bifurcated and separately accounted for at fair value.

In the event of a change of control, AxoGen must repurchase the assigned interests from the Company for a repurchase price equal to an amount that, together with payments already made by AxoGen, would generate a 32.5% internal rate of return to the Company. The Company has concluded that the change of control provision is an embedded derivative that should be bifurcated and separately recorded at its estimated fair value. The estimated fair value of the change of control provision was approximately $1.1 million and $0.6 million as of December 31, 2013, and December 31, 2012, respectively. The estimated fair value of this embedded derivative is included in the carrying value of the AxoGen Note Receivable. The Company recognized approximately $0.5 million related to the change in the estimated fair value of embedded derivative during the year ended December 31, 2013.

At any time after September 30, 2016, AxoGen, at its option, can repurchase the assigned interests under the Royalty Agreement for a price applicable in a change of control.

During the term of the Royalty Agreement, the Company is entitled to designate an individual to be a member of AxoGen's board of directors. The Company has exercised this right and on October 5, 2012, upon close of the transaction, the Company's President and Chief Executive Officer was elected to AxoGen's board of directors.

On August 14, 2013, PDL purchased 1,166,666 shares of AXGN at $3.00 per share, totaling $3.5 million. The shares are classified as available-for-sale and recorded as short term investments on the consolidated balance sheet. As of December 31, 2013, the shares were valued at $5.2 million, which results in an unrealized gain of $1.7 million and is recorded in other comprehensive income (loss).

Avinger Note Receivable and Royalty Agreement

On April 18, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Avinger, under which we made available to Avinger up to $40.0 million to be used by Avinger in connection with the commercialization of its currently marketed lumivascular catheter devices and in the development of Avinger's lumivascular atherectomy device. Of the $40.0 million available to Avinger, we funded an initial $20.0 million, net of fees, at close of the transaction. Upon the attainment by Avinger of a certain revenue milestone to be accomplished no later than the end of the first half of 2014, we will fund them an additional amount between $10.0 million and $20.0 million (net of fees) at Avinger's election. Outstanding borrowings under the initial loan bear interest at a stated rate of 12% per annum, and any future outstanding borrowings as a result of an additional amount funded upon reaching the revenue milestone will bear interest at the rate of 14% per annum.

Avinger is required to make quarterly interest and principal payments. Principal repayment will commence on: (i) the eleventh interest payment date if the revenue milestone is not achieved or (ii) the thirteenth interest payment date if the revenue milestone is achieved. The principal amount outstanding at commencement of repayment, after taking into account any payment-in-kind, will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature in April 2018.

In connection with entering into the credit agreement, the Company will receive a low, single-digit royalty on Avinger's net revenues through April 2018. Avinger may prepay the outstanding principal and accrued interest on the notes receivable at any

47



time. If Avinger repays the notes receivable prior to April 2018, the royalty on Avinger's net revenues will be reduced by 50% and will be subject to certain minimum payments from the prepayment date through April 2018.

The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Avinger and any of its subsidiaries (other than controlled foreign corporations, if any). The credit agreement provides for a number of standard events of default, including payment, bankruptcy, covenant, representation and warranty and judgment defaults.

LENSAR Credit Agreement

On October 1, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with LENSAR, under which PDL made available to LENSAR up to $60 million to be used by LENSAR in connection with the commercialization of its currently marketed LENSAR Laser System. Of the $60 million available to LENSAR, an initial $40 million, net of fees, was funded by PDL at close of the transaction. Upon the attainment by LENSAR of a specified sales milestone to be accomplished no later than September 30, 2014, PDL will fund LENSAR an additional $20 million. Outstanding borrowings under the loans bear interest at the rate of 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears.

Principal repayment will commence on the thirteenth interest payment date or December 30, 2016. The principal amount outstanding at the commencement of repayment will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature on October 1, 2018. LENSAR may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The loans are secured by all of the assets of LENSAR.

Durata Credit Agreement

On October 31, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Durata, whereby the Company made available to Durata up to $70.0 million . Of the $70.0 million available to Durata, an initial $25.0 million (tranche one), net of fees, was funded by the Company at the close of the transaction. Upon marketing approval of dalbavancin in the United States, to be accomplished no later than December 31, 2014 (the tranche two milestone), the Company will fund Durata an additional $15 million (tranche two). Within 9 months after the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, Durata may request up to a single additional $30 million borrowing. Until the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, outstanding borrowings under tranche one bear interest at the rate of 14.0% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears. Upon occurrence of the tranche two milestone, the interest rate of the loans will decrease to 12.75%.

Principal repayment will commence on the fifth interest payment date, March 31, 2015. The principal amount outstanding will be repaid quarterly over the remainder of the loans in an increasing percentage of the principal outstanding at commencement of repayment. The loans will mature on October 31, 2018. Durata may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The Company is entitled to receive a fee in addition to the prepayment penalty in the event that Durata undergoes a change in control. The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Durata.

Direct Flow Credit Agreement

On November 5, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Direct Flow Medical, in which PDL will provide up to $50.0 million to Direct Flow Medical. Of the $50.0 million available to Direct Flow Medical, an initial $35.0 million (tranche one), net of fees, was provided by the Company at the close of the transaction. Upon the attainment of a specified revenue milestone to be accomplished no later than December 31, 2014 (the tranche two milestone), the Company will loan to Direct Flow Medical an additional $15.0 million, net of fees. Until the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, outstanding borrowings under tranche one bear interest at the rate of 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears. Upon occurrence of the tranche two milestone, the interest rate of the loans will decrease to 13.5%.

Principal repayment will commence on the twelfth interest payment date, September 30, 2016. The principal amount outstanding at commencement of repayment will be repaid in equal installments until final maturity of the loans. The loans will mature on November 5, 2018. Direct Flow Medical may elect to prepay the loans at any time, subject to a prepayment penalty that decreases over the life of the loans. The obligations under the credit agreement are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of Direct Flow Medical and any of its subsidiaries.

48




Intangible Assets

Depomed Royalty Purchase and Sales Agreement

On October 18, 2013, PDL entered into a royalty purchase and sale agreement with Depomed, Inc. and Depo DR Sub, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Depomed, whereby the Company acquired the rights to receive royalties and milestones payables on sales of Type 2 diabetes products licensed by Depomed in exchange for a $240.5 million cash payment. The transaction closed simultaneously with the execution of the royalty agreement.

Under the terms of the royalty agreement, the Company will receive all royalty and milestone payments due under license agreements between Depomed and its licensees until the Company has received payments equal to two times the cash payment made to Depomed, after which all net payments received will be shared evenly between the Company and Depomed.

The royalty agreement terminates on the third anniversary following the date upon which the later of the following occurs: (a) October 25, 2021, or (b) at such time as no royalty payments remain payable under any license agreement and each of the license agreements has expired by its terms.

Convertible Notes

Series 2012 Notes

We have actively worked to restructure the Company’s capital and reduce the potential dilution associated with our convertible notes. As part of those efforts, in January 2012, we exchanged and subsequently retired $169.0 million aggregate principal amount of our February 2015 Notes for an identical principal amount of our new Series 2012 Notes, plus a cash payment of $5.00 for each $1,000 principal amount tendered for a total cash incentive payment of approximately $0.8 million. In February 2012, we entered into separate privately negotiated exchange agreements under which we exchanged and subsequently retired an additional $10.0 million aggregate principal amount of our February 2015 Notes for $10.0 million aggregate principal amount of our Series 2012 Notes. In August 2013, the Company entered into a separate privately negotiated exchange agreement under which it retired the final $1.0 million aggregate principal amount of the Company's outstanding February 2015 Notes. Pursuant to the exchange agreement, the holder of the February 2015 Notes received $1.0 million aggregate principal amount of the Company's Series 2012 Notes. Immediately following the exchange, no principal amount of the February 2015 Notes remained outstanding and $180.0 million principal amount of the Series 2012 Notes is outstanding.

Our Series 2012 Notes net share settle, meaning that if a conversion occurs, the principal amount is due in cash, and to the extent that the conversion value exceeds the principal amount, the difference is due in shares of our common stock. The effect of issuing $179.0 million aggregate principal of our Series 2012 Notes with the net share settle feature in exchange for our February 2015 Notes was the reduction of 27.8 million shares of potential dilution to our stockholders at the time of the exchange.

On February 5 and 6, 2014, the Company entered into separate, privately negotiated exchange and purchase agreements under which it retired $131.7 million in aggregate principal of the Company’s outstanding Series 2012 Notes. The exchange agreements provided for the issuance, by the Company, of shares of common stock and a cash payment for the Series 2012 Notes being exchanged, and the purchase agreement provided for a cash payment for the Series 2012 Notes being repurchased. The Company issued a total of 20.3 million shares of its common stock and paid an aggregate cash payment of $34.2 million pursuant to the exchange and repurchase agreements.

May 2015 Notes

On May 16, 2011, we issued $155.3 million in aggregate principal amount, at par, of our May 2015 Notes in an underwritten public offering, for net proceeds of $149.7 million. Our May 2015 Notes are due May 1, 2015, and we pay interest at 3.75% on our May 2015 Notes semiannually in arrears on May 1 and November 1 of each year, beginning November 1, 2011. Proceeds from our May 2015 Notes, net of amounts used for purchased call option transactions and provided by the warrant transactions described below, were used to redeem our 2012 Notes. Upon the occurrence of a fundamental change, as defined in the indenture, holders have the option to require PDL to repurchase their May 2015 Notes at a purchase price equal to 100% of the principal, plus accrued interest.


49



February 2018 Notes

On February 6, 2014, the Company agreed to sell $260.87 million aggregate principal amount of its 4.00% Convertible Senior Notes due February 1, 2018, in an underwritten public offering. The conversion rate of the February 2018 Notes will initially be 109.1048 shares of common stock per $1,000 principal amount of the February 2018 Notes equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $9.17 per share of common stock. The conversion rate, subject to increase under certain circumstances, will not be increased in respect of regular quarterly cash dividends paid by us that do not exceed $0.15 per share.

On February 12, 2014, the Company issued $300 million aggregate principal amount of February 2018 Notes, which included $39.13 million aggregate principal amount of February 2018 Notes issued pursuant to the exercise of the underwriters’ overallotment option to purchase additional February 2018 Notes. In connection with the offering of the February 2018 Notes, we entered into privately negotiated convertible note hedge transactions with affiliates of RBC Capital Markets and Well Fargo Securities (“hedge counterparties”) and privately negotiated warrant transactions with the hedge counterparties relating to the same number of shares of PDL’s common stock.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As of December 31, 2013 , we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements, as defined under SEC Regulation S-K Item 303(a)(4)(ii).

Contractual Obligations

Convertible Notes

As of December 31, 2013 , our contractual obligations consisted primarily of our Series 2012 Notes and our May 2015 Notes, which in the aggregate totaled $335.3 million in principal. Our Series 2012 and our May 2015 Notes are not puttable by the note holders other than in the context of a fundamental change.
 
We expect that our debt service obligations over the next several years will consist of interest payments and repayment of our Series 2012 Notes and our May 2015 Notes. We may further seek to exchange, repurchase or otherwise acquire the convertible notes in the open market in the future which could adversely affect the amount or timing of any distributions to our stockholders. We would make such exchanges or repurchases only if we deemed it to be in our stockholders’ best interest. We may finance such repurchases with cash on hand and/or with public or private equity or debt financings if we deem such financings are available on favorable terms.

See Note 21 for subsequent event transactions related to convertible notes.

Term Loan

As of December 31, 2013 , our contractual obligation for our term loan total $75.0 million in principal. Interest and principal payments under the credit agreement are due on the interest payment dates of January 31, April 30, and July 31 of 2014, with the remaining outstanding balance due on October 28, 2014.

Notes Receivable and Other Long Term Receivables

On April 18, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Avinger, under which we made available to Avinger up to $40.0 million to be used by Avinger in connection with the commercialization of its currently marketed lumivascular catheter devices and in the development of Avinger's lumivascular atherectomy device. Of the $40.0 million available to Avinger, we funded an initial $20.0 million, net of fees, at close of the transaction. Upon the attainment of certain revenue milestones to be accomplished no later than the end of the first half of 2014, we will fund Avinger an additional amount between $10.0 million and $20.0 million (net of fees) at Avinger's election.

On October 1, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with LENSAR, under which PDL made available to LENSAR up to $60 million to be used by LENSAR in connection with the commercialization of its currently marketed LENSAR Laser System. Of the $60 million available to LENSAR, an initial $40 million, net of fees, was funded by PDL at close of the transaction. Upon the attainment by LENSAR of a specified sales milestone to be accomplished no later than September 30, 2014, PDL will fund LENSAR an additional $20 million. Outstanding borrowings under the loans bear interest at the rate of 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears.

50




On October 31, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Durata, whereby the Company made available to Durata up to $70.0 million. Of the $70.0 million available to Durata, an initial $25.0 million (tranche one), net of fees, was funded by the Company at the close of the transaction. Upon marketing approval of dalbavancin in the United States, to be accomplished no later than December 31, 2014 (the tranche two milestone), the Company will fund Durata an additional $15 million (tranche two). Within 9 months after the occurrence of the tranche two milestone, Durata may request up to a single additional $30 million borrowing.

On November 5, 2013, PDL entered into a credit agreement with Direct Flow Medical, in which PDL will provide up to $50.0 million to Direct Flow Medical. Of the $50.0 million available to Direct Flow Medical, an initial $35.0 million, net of fees, was provided by the company at the close of the transaction. Upon the attainment of a specified revenue milestone to be accomplished no later than December 31, 2014, the Company will loan to Direct Flow Medical an additional $15.0 million, net of fees.

Material contractual obligations including interest under lease and debt agreements for the next five years and thereafter are:

 
 
 
Payments Due by Period
 
 
 
Less Than
 
 
 
More than
 
 
(In thousands)
 
1 Year
 
1-3 Years
 
3 Years
 
Total
Operating leases
(1)  
 
$
102

 
$
32

 
$

 
$
134

Convertible notes
(2)  
 
10,997

 
337,823

 

 
348,820

Term Loan
(3)  
 
75,768

 

 

 
75,768

Notes receivable
(4)  
 
70,000

 
15,000

 

 
85,000

Total contractual obligations
 
$
156,867

 
$
352,855

 
$

 
$
509,722


_____________________________
(1) Amounts represent the lease for our headquarters in Incline Village, Nevada and operating leases for office equipment.
(2) Amounts represent principal and cash interest payments due on the convertible notes.
(3) Amounts represent principal and cash interest payments due on the term loan.
(4) Amounts represent tranche to be paid upon future actions as described above.

See Note 21 for subsequent event transactions related to convertible notes.

Lease Guarantee
 
In connection with the Spin-Off of Facet, we entered into amendments to the leases for our former facilities in Redwood City, California, under which Facet was added as a co-tenant, and a Co-Tenancy Agreement, under which Facet agreed to indemnify us for all matters related to the leases attributable to the period after the Spin-Off date. Should Facet default under its lease obligations, we could be held liable by the landlord as a co-tenant and, thus, we have in substance guaranteed the payments under the lease agreements for the Redwood City facilities. In April 2010, Abbott acquired Facet and later renamed the entity AbbVie Biotherapeutics, Inc. As of December 31, 2013 , the total lease payments for the duration of the guarantee, which runs through December 2021, are approximately $90.2 million , and has not been included in the table above. If AbbVie were to default, we could also be responsible for lease related costs including utilities, property taxes and common area maintenance which may be as much as the actual lease payments. We have recorded a liability of $10.7 million on our Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2013 and 2012 , related to this guarantee.

Indemnification
 
As permitted under Delaware law, under the terms of our bylaws, the Company has entered into indemnification agreements with its directors and executive officers. Under these agreements, the Company has agreed to indemnify such individuals for certain events or occurrences, subject to certain limits, against liabilities that arise by reason of their status as directors or officers and to advance expense incurred by such individuals in connection with related legal proceedings. While the maximum amount of potential future indemnification is unlimited, we have a director and officer insurance policy that limits our exposure and may enable us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid.


51



ITEM 7A.        QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Foreign Currency Risk
 
The underlying sales of our licensees’ products are conducted in multiple countries and in multiple currencies throughout the world. While foreign currency conversion terms vary by license agreement, generally most agreements require that royalties first be calculated in the currency of sale and then converted into U.S. dollars using the average daily exchange rates for that currency for a specified period at the end of the calendar quarter. Accordingly, when the U.S. dollar weakens in relation to other currencies, the converted amount is greater than it would have been had the U.S. dollar not weakened. More than 50% of our licensees’ product sales are in currencies other than U.S. dollars; as such, our revenues may fluctuate due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates and is subject to foreign currency exchange risk. For example, in a quarter in which we generate $70 million in royalty revenues, and when approximately $35 million is based on sales in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, if the U.S. dollar strengthens across all currencies by 10% during the conversion period for that quarter, when compared to the same amount of local currency royalties for the prior year, U.S. dollar converted royalties will be approximately $3.5 million less in that current quarter sales, assuming that the currency risk in such forecasted sales was not hedged.
 
We hedge Euro-denominated risk exposures related to our licensees’ product sales with Euro forward contracts, and in 2011, Euro forward and option contracts. In general, these contracts are intended to offset the underlying Euro market risk in our royalty revenues. Our current contracts extend through the fourth quarter of 2014 and are all classified for accounting purposes as cash flow hedges. We continue to monitor the change in the Euro exchange rate and regularly purchase additional forward contracts to achieve hedged rates that approximate the average exchange rate of the Euro over the year, which we anticipate will better offset potential changes in exchange rates than simply entering into larger contracts at a single point in time.

In January 2012, we modified our existing Euro forward and option contracts related to our licensees’ sales through December 2012 into forward contracts with more favorable rates than the rate that was ensured by the previous contracts. Additionally, we entered into a series of Euro forward contracts covering the quarters in which our licensees’ sales occur through December 2013.

During the third quarter of 2012, we reduced our forecasted exposure to the Euro for 2013 royalties. In August 2012, we de-designated and terminated certain forward contracts, recording a gain of approximately $391,000 in interest and other income, net. The termination of these contracts was effected through a reduction in the notional amount of the original hedge contracts that was then exchanged for new hedges of 2014 Euro-denominated royalties. These 2014 hedges were entered into at a rate more favorable than the market rate as of the date of the exchange.

Gains or losses on our cash flow hedges are recognized in the same period that the hedged transaction impacts earnings as an adjustment to royalty revenue. Ineffectiveness, if any, resulting from the change in fair value of the modified 2012 hedge or lower than forecasted Euro-based royalties will be reclassified from other comprehensive income (loss) and recorded as interest and other income, net, in the period it occurs. The following table summarizes the notional amounts, Euro exchange rates and fair values of our outstanding Euro contracts designated as hedges at December 31, 2013 and 2012 :

 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
Euro Forward Contracts
 
 
 
(in thousands)
 
(in thousands)
Currency
 
Settlement Price
($ per Euro)
 
Type
 
Notional Amount
 
Fair Value
 
Notional Amount
 
Fair Value
Euro
 
1.230
 
Sell Euro
 
$

 
$

 
$
27,553

 
$
(2,036
)
Euro
 
1.240
 
Sell Euro
 
10,850

 
(1,207
)
 
10,850

 
(726
)
Euro
 
1.270
 
Sell Euro
 
44,450

 
(3,760
)
 
44,450

 
(1,950
)
Euro
 
1.281
 
Sell Euro
 
36,814

 
(2,785
)
 
36,814

 
(1,331
)
Euro
 
1.300
 
Sell Euro
 
19,500

 
(1,119
)
 
91,000

 
(1,538
)
Total
 
 
 
 
 
$
111,614

 
$
(8,871
)
 
$
210,667

 
$
(7,581
)

Interest Rate Risk
 
Our investment portfolio was approximately $91.2 million at December 31, 2013 , and $140.8 million at December 31, 2012 , and consisted of investments in Rule 2a-7 money market funds and a corporate security at December 31, 2013, and Rule 2a-7 money

52



market funds, certificates of deposit and corporate debt securities at December 31, 2012. If market interest rates were to have increased by 1% in either of these years, there would have been no material impact on the fair value of our portfolio.
 
The aggregate fair value of our convertible notes was estimated to be $490.0 million at December 31, 2013 , and $410.5 million at December 31, 2012 , based on available pricing information. At December 31, 2013 , our convertible notes consisted of our Series 2012 Notes, with a fixed interest rate of 2.875% and our May 2015 Notes, with a fixed interest rate of 3.75%. At December 31, 2012 , our convertible notes consisted of our Series 2012 Notes, with a fixed interest rate of 2.875%, May 2015 Notes, with a fixed interest rate of 3.75% and our February 2015 Notes, with a fixed interest rate of 2.875%. These obligations are subject to interest rate risk because the fixed interest rates under these obligations may exceed current interest rates.

The fair value of our term loan was estimated to be $75.0 million at December 31, 2013 , based on available pricing information. No amounts were outstanding under the term loan at December 31, 2012. The interest rates per annum applicable to amounts outstanding under the Term Loan are, at the Company’s option, either (a) the base rate plus 1.00% , or (b) the Eurodollar rate plus 2.00% per annum. Interest and principal payments under the credit agreement are due on the interest payment dates of January 31, April 30, and July 31 of 2014, with the remaining outstanding balance due on October 28, 2014. These obligations are subject to interest rate risk because the variable interest rate may increase in future periods.

The following table presents information about our material debt obligations that are sensitive to changes in interest rates. The table presents principal amounts and related weighted-average interest rates by year of expected maturity for our debt obligations or the earliest year in which the holders may put the debt to us. Our convertible notes may be converted to common stock prior to the maturity date.
(In thousands)
 
2014
 
2015
 
 Total
 
 Fair Value
 
Convertible notes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variable Rate
 
$
75,000

 
$

 
$
75,000

 
$
75,000

 
Fixed Rate
 
335,250

 

 
335,250

 
489,954

(1)  
Total
 
$
410,250

 
$

 
$
410,250

 
$
564,954

 
Average Interest Rate
 
2.68
%
 
%
 
 
 
 
 
_________________________
(1)
The fair value of the remaining payments under our convertible notes and term loan were estimated based on the trading value of these notes at December 31, 2013 .


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ITEM 8.           FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
PDL BIOPHARMA, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(In thousands, except par value)
 
December 31,
 
2013
 
2012
Assets
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
94,302

 
$
131,212

Restricted investment

 
20,000

Short-term investments
5,238

 
17,477

Receivables from licensees
300

 
366

Deferred tax assets
377

 
1,613

Notes receivable
13

 
7,504

Prepaid and other current assets
7,467

 
4,813

Total current assets
107,697

 
182,985

Property and equipment, net
41

 
59

Notes and other receivables, long-term
193,840

 
85,704

Long-term deferred tax assets
6,700

 
4,552

Other assets

 
6,666

Intangible assets
235,677

 

Total assets
$
543,955

 
$
279,966

Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
287

 
$
1,074

Accrued liabilities
11,857

 
9,400

Term loan payable
74,397

 

Convertible notes payable
320,883

 

Total current liabilities
407,424

 
10,474

Convertible notes payable

 
309,952

Other long-term liabilities
23,042

 
27,662

Total liabilities
430,466

 
348,088

Commitments and contingencies (Note 12)

 

Stockholders' equity (deficit):
 
 
 
Preferred stock, par value $0.01 per share, 10,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding

 

Common stock, par value $0.01 per share, 350,000 shares authorized; 139,935 and 139,816 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively
1,399

 
1,398

Additional paid-in capital
(233,173
)
 
(234,066
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(4,888
)
 
(5,088
)
Retained earnings
350,151